SIMPLE electrical job. Cost via electrician? chg direct-wire to plug & socket

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On 2/3/2012 7:22 AM, RBM wrote:

Check with your local electrical inspector.
If done properly, ours said it was legal and safe to do the plug and cord setup.
His only recommendation was to use a 12 gauge appliance cord set, proper strain relief (not romex clamp) and a high-quality 20 amp receptacle.
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On 2/3/2012 4:34 PM, Horace Greeley wrote:

That really makes no sense. Typical oil burner/ furnace is fed with a 15 amp circuit. It's either code compliant or it's not, regardless of size or ampacity of cord and receptacle.
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20 amp twist locks are a lot more common than 15 amp twist locks.
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On 2/3/2012 5:38 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

... and that has what to do with anything code related?
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Nothing - but it has an awfull lot to do with why one might use a 20 amp cord/plug. As far as the code:
422.16 Flexible Cords. (A) General. Flexible cord shall be permitted (1) for the connection of appliances to facilitate their frequent interchange or to prevent the transmission of noise or vibration
If you have a "compliant coupling" on the ductwork to eliminate vibration, the flexible cord is allowed under the code for the same reason.. Immaterial that the rigid gas line passes vibration to the house. No inspector can say FOR SURE that the cord is not there for vibration reasons - and if it is allowed for that purpose there is no SAFETY reason for denying it - hense the overlooking of the "infraction" by so many inspectors.
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On 2/3/2012 7:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I don't think too many inspectors would consider a typical oil burner as producing noise or vibration as a reason to use a flexible cord. Second, you left out half of the article. The half where it clarifies the use of cords on appliances. If you're going to try and twist and tweak the code, at least furnish all the information
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No twisting at all You forgot - it is one OR the other. If one can be made to apply/fit the other doesn't mean a hill of beans.
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On 2/3/2012 5:04 PM, RBM wrote:

You want your furnace crapping out because of a cheap piece of junk outlet that barely holds the plug in place?
Yes, the cheap 50 cent outlets you find at McLowes are code compliant but they're still junk. You won't find one in my house.
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wrote:

Your furnace is plugged into an outlet? Never seen that.
The $.50 outlets (are they that expensive now?) aren't all that bad for places where there are few insertion cycles. Kitchens, hallways, and the like where they're used a lot, should have spec or even hospital grade outlets.
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Not now -- but that situation (furnace pluged into an outlet) is what I *WANT* -- so when the neighborhood power goes out, and it's 15F outside, I can UNplug the furnace from the wall and PLUG it into a heavy-duty extension-cord that goes to my little electric generator -- which I'd run for half an hour every two hours or so to keep the house warm and (via 2nd extension cord to the generator) the refrigerator cold.
David
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On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 16:20:48 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

Why don't you just do the job right?
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On 2/6/2012 9:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I'm not convinced that putting a plug and cord on a gas furnace is unsafe. Yah, I know, Barney Fife says it violates some NEC rule but is it actually unsafe?
Besides, most of us are not exactly flush with cash right now.
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On 2/4/2012 11:33 AM, Horace Greeley wrote:

You miss the point entirely.A typical residential central heating system is fed with a 15 amp circuit. Despite the Nec violation in connecting the appliance with cord and plug, it is also a Nec violation to install a 20 amp outlet on a 15 amp circuit. It has nothing to do with the quality of the receptacle itself, or the cord for that matter. There are extremely high quality 15 amp receptacles, and hard service cords rated for 15 amp as well. Any electrical inspector would know this.
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Well, mine's 12gauge, but each end looks the same as on an 18.
David
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On 2/6/2012 11:27 AM, David Combs wrote:

You notice that!! That's the kind in nonsense you get when amateurs play electrician
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On 2/6/2012 3:41 PM, RBM wrote:

I be scared O 'lectrizity! ^_^
TDD
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On Sat, 4 Feb 2012 13:57:17 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Its 5 degrees, the storm is still blowing and the power went out. Do you give a crap about what is allowed? If it makes heat, I'm doing it (safely).
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On 2/7/2012 5:58 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Best answer! 2 thumbs up!
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So, wire it back up, later, and no one needs to know.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 2/7/2012 5:58 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Best answer! 2 thumbs up!
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On 2/3/2012 1:34 PM, Horace Greeley wrote:

I went thru the same process. Prevailing opinion is that devices permanently attached to the structure must be permanently wired. Heating system seems to be permanently attached. Reading the NEC, it appears that's what it says.
So, I went down to the permit office and talked with the inspector. He said, "no problem; putting a socket in the box and plug on the wire will pass my inspection".
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