SIMPLE electrical job. Cost via electrician? chg direct-wire to plug & socket

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Here's what I want to do.
I've got steam/boiler heater, runs on gas, the only electricty needed is to run the (solenoid?) thermostat, basically.
It's powered via a cable (covered in flexible metal tubing) that connects into the wall 110-AC line.
What I want to do is get that changed from that direct connection to the wall, to instead end in a grounded male plug.
That's it!
Probably requiring another separate female socket box to plug it into.
WHY? So that when the power goes out and I get my small generator cranked up, I can unplug the heating apparatus (boiler, etc) from the wall and plug it into an extension cord from the generator. So I don't freeze my ass.
--
Now, I figure that this has to be done "to code", thus has
to be done by a licensed electrician.
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On 2/2/2012 1:08 PM, David Combs wrote: <big snip>

it wasn't very much at all, until you got to the last sentence. at that point, it became a much bigger bill.
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On 2 Feb 2012 15:08:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

OK so if this is cord and plug connected, all of that transfer equipment stuff IS bullshit. The code problem is that this is probably not listed as a cord and plug connected piece of equipment. Horrible violation ... no. Is the current metal armored whip terminating in a regular device box? I can't say it is OK to do this but if it was me ... Install a receptacle in the box, remove the whip from the heater and add a cord and plug assembly and rock on.
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Not being electrician, I can't comment on what they charge.
From what I know of the NEC, the heating plant has to be straight wired from the device to the breaker, so the plug and socket routine is not legal. I know. Your refrigerator, your TV, everything else in the house is wired with a plug and socket. But, that's what I've heard about the NEC.
That said, it can't be all that gosh awful expensive. And, it really is a brilliant idea. The challenge is to find someone who will actually DO said rewiring.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Here's what I want to do.
I've got steam/boiler heater, runs on gas, the only electricty needed is to run the (solenoid?) thermostat, basically.
It's powered via a cable (covered in flexible metal tubing) that connects into the wall 110-AC line.
What I want to do is get that changed from that direct connection to the wall, to instead end in a grounded male plug.
That's it!
Probably requiring another separate female socket box to plug it into.
WHY? So that when the power goes out and I get my small generator cranked up, I can unplug the heating apparatus (boiler, etc) from the wall and plug it into an extension cord from the generator. So I don't freeze my ass.
--
Now, I figure that this has to be done "to code", thus has
to be done by a licensed electrician.
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 2 Feb 2012 15:08:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:

All you need to do is turn off the breaker, disconnect the hard-wired connection, and replace it with a Duplex receptacle of the correct amperage, then remove the solid conductor wire from the boiler control box and replace it with a flexible cord of the correct guage, with the correct plug.
Dead simple job, and no electician "required" in most jurisdictions - particularly if you are reasonably handy and know anything about electricity and wiring (or can read and comprehend a book)
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On Thu, 2 Feb 2012 20:11:42 -0800 (PST), Evan

It would IF there are ANY of those safety devices currently installed or required, and they are "upstream" of the main power connection. Most today, I imagine, would be low voltage controls wired out from the main control box.
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On Feb 6, 11:50pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Umm, No, they would not be low voltage controls wired out from the box...
The "Emergency Shut-Off Switch" is a normal single pole lighting switch installed in a remote location usually with a red switch plate, so that the heating plant can be shut down without needing to enter the basement in the event of a fire or CO leakage condition...
The "firematic" is a safety device mounted in an outlet box directly above the heating plant which will automatically break the 120v circuit in the event the temperature gets too hot which happens when things catch on fire...
Both of these devices are required in many places to be installed between the power supply at the circuit breaker and the service kill switch mounted on the side of the unit... Even *if* you installed a switched outlet to use a cord set to connect the heating plant to a gen set at the heating device, you would eliminate all of those safety devices from the circuit when running the heating plant off a generator...
Why do people see the need to do things in such over complicated ways ? If all you are concerned with is using your heating boiler during a power failure, the single circuit transfer switch at the power panel is ideal -- no lengthy extension cords all over the house leading from the boiler to outside where the generator is located... The OP could install one of those rather easily and not have to worry, with multiple circuit type transfer switches there is usually an option available with the kit to hard wire the link from the transfer switch to an outlet outside for a short cord from the generator to the hard wired outlet point rather than laying out long runs of extension cords...
Not only would installing the transfer switch equipment and dedicated outlet/hard wired link for the generator make more sense, a generator outside with a short cord on it is a less desirable target... You could pour a small slab like you might see under an air conditioning heat pump with a large size eye bolt set in it so that you could use a padlock and chain to secure the generator in place while it is being used...
~~ Evan
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On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 22:21:34 -0800 (PST), Evan

Not a very imaginative guy, are you??? The switch is before the firematic. Nothing stopping an electrician or other competent handy-guy from installing the plug and receptacle after the switch and before the firematic - or iven IN PLACE OF the switch. A plug IS a disconnect device.

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On Feb 7, 6:53pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Nothing except the NEC, that is. I'd say now you're violating code so that even an inspector that would pass a boiler connected with a cord would probably fail it. Where does using this cord stop because it's now part of the wiring of the house? Is it OK if I run the cord 25 feet across the basement, through the structure and into a receptacle on the basement stairs to serve as a disconnect there instead of a normal furnace switch?
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...
Powering the entire house via the panel is nice.
BUT HORRIBLY EXPENSIVE!
Right now I have this small generator, maybe $399 at Costco 15 or 20 years ago. All I care about is (a) keeping the frozen food frozen and the cold food cold and (b) not freezing my ass (AND the water pipes and the entire rest of the house).
That's it!
With these little 3-AAA "headlamp" lights (hi and low settings) and lots of AAA and AA batteries from Costco, reading is no problem.
Or, candle, plus alum-foil bent in cylindrical or parabolic shape around the candle thus concentrating the light on the book.
And run that small generator only 20 or 30 min every two hours uses only 1/4 the gasoline of full time.
On the other hand, powering the whole house takes a BIG generator, the concrete slab installation, large fuel storage, etc, for what, $5K? More?
(And attract interest from the entire neighborhood, what with lighted house visible for, what, miles? Atrracting who knows what kinds of bugs (gun-toting ones)!)
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On Feb 11, 12:51pm, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (David Combs) wrote:
on.ca> wrote:

Define horribly expensive. The necessary materials are ~ $250 DIY and that's it, except maybe $50 for a permit. Pay an electrician $250 and it's $500.

Who said anything about concrete, large fuel, or $5K? You could hook that same $399 generator up via the panel so that you could power whatever you choose in the house, not just the furnace and fridge via extension cords. How convenient is that? Fuel is dependent entirely on what you choose to power and for how long. Me, instead of doing it half-assed and powering only the furnace, I'd rather spend $250, do it right and NEC compliant, and be able to power whatever in the house I choose.
Capiche?

If you're a scared little sissy, that I can't help you with.
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On Sat, 11 Feb 2012 10:49:44 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Nasty trader calling anyone who dissagrees with him names again.
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On Feb 11, 4:16pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

er.on.ca> wrote:

Nasty? Of course you'd never call anyone a nasty name now, would you?
From yesterday:
" I capiche you are a "culo"
We can add hypocrite to your list of qualities.
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On Thu, 2 Feb 2012 13:01:02 -0800, "Bill"

Illegal to have a plug on solid conductor cord - if not illegal, not adviesable. You need a good "appliance cord" - I like teck cable for that kind of setup. #14 or #12.
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This thing pulls (solenoid, thermostat upstairs) like nothing, 5 watts maybe?
I looked in that spirally flexible metal 3/4-inch diameter tube that encloses the power wires to the wall, at the end of it, where I could see the wires themselves. Two shielded wires, I think, don't recall seeing a third.
Anyway, I'll check out "teck cable", size 14 or 12 (the lower, the bigger, right?).
Thanks,
David
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Do they do something special to uglyfy those plugs you use??? Ours look like

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Way back when, we hired artists to uglify them. Makes us special.
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On 2/2/2012 3:08 PM, David Combs wrote:

As gfretwell points out, you can't properly wire your boiler to a cord and plug. To do what you want, properly, you'll need one of these:
http://www.wayfair.com/Reliance-Controls-Easy-Tran-Transfer-Switch-TF151-RLC1017.html?refid=FR49-RLC1017
The job will take less than an hour and the typical service charge for that time, in your area will be around $150
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I've seen furnaces connected with a twist-lock plug - it meets the requirement for a disconnect within reach of the furnace.(takes the place of a switch) and is also a foolproof way of connecting to a genset.
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On 2/2/2012 11:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That maybe true in Canada, but it doesn't meet 422.16 of the Nec, in the U.S., at least not for your garden variety central heating system.
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