Silly Question about Installing Tile in a Bathroom

We have a small half bath that is carpeted. The lavatory sink is mounted on a pedestal.
The carpeting in the room goes up to the edge of the toilet and the pedestal.
I have to replace the sink and pedestal. (Something got dropped into the sink and cracked it.)
Since we're doing the sink, we've been thinking about taking out the carpet and replacing it with ceramic tile. (It's unlikely that we could get a pedestal that wouldn't require a carpet modification to install.
Here's the silly question:
Does the tile get installed first, and then the pedestal and sink get installed on top of the tile, or does the sink and pedestal get installed first and the tile brought up to the edge of the pedestal?
The same question applies for the toilet. Do I need to pull the toilet and install the tile, or tile right to the edge of the toilet?
I've looked in our other bathrooms, but those have linoleum in the wet areas, so I can't tell whether the linoleum goes under the toilet or just up to the edge of it.
Thanks.
Bill L
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Bill Leska wrote:

Yup. Then you can change the toilet/sink again some day.
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Paul Furman wrote:

Agreed. Rip it all out to the bare walls. Keep in mind that you may need to add another layer of flooring (ply/cement board as example) in order to have enough floor rigidity so that the new tile doesn't break up in 6 mos.
Do some research on floor tiling.
Jim
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Thanks for the advice. I shouldn't have to add anything to the floor, since the slab is under the carpet.
But if I pull the toilet and tile up to the flange, will the toilet still mount on the flange, or do I need to somehow pull the flange out and build it up, too?
One other thing: How does one handle the edge of the carpeting where it comes into the room? I imagine I would install a carpet tack strip across the doorway, but do I need to do anything to the carpet so that it doesn't start unravelling?
Thanks again.
BL

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Bill Leska wrote:

<SNIP>
Since you'll only be adding the thickness of a tile, you can leave the flange where it is and double up the wax ring or use a "flange extender" (like a plastic shim). Use enough wax or whatever so that the wax ring will compress about 1/2" to 3/4" when the bowl is set.
The bowl may not sit evenly on the tiles. If it rocks, shim it (I like thin rubber gasket material) or set in grout/plaster or caulk. There are as many opinions on this as there are Usenet users... Do a GOOGLE Advanced search.
Jim
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Home Depot has a really good book titled Home Improvement 1-2-3 that covers everything, including toilet replacement and ceramic floor tiling. They also have specific 1-2-3 books for specific tasks - i.e. plumbing or floors. They also have some very knowledgable associates that can give you some good advice.
We are right in the midst of doing exactly what you are talking about. But our task just got a lot worse when we pulled up the toilet and found that the old metal flange was rusted away, and some of the old subfloor and underlayment that was used when the house was built was water damaged. We're having to cut out part of that flooring and get down to the sewer pipe so that we can also replace that. But when we're done we'll be very glad that we went to the trouble. If we'd have cheated and just tiled up to the toilet, we never would have known that the floor and flange were in such bad shape.
So, follow what the experts tell you. It may end up being a little more work, but it can save some real problems later down the road.
Regarding bringing the tile to the carpet - we were advised by multiple source to get a "Schluter" bar - part of it goes under the tile with the thinset, and then the tiles butts up against a upward piece. This goes right up agains the carpet. We're told that we shouldn't need anything else. Haven't got that far yet ourselves, but that's what we're planning to do.

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We had our bathroom tiled about 5 years ago by a trusted, recommended professional who'd been tiling since the 1970s. Sink and toilet were removed, then went back down on top of the tile.
Makes sense to do it this way, really. You'll always have a one-piece floor if ever you change out your sink or toilet again in the future -- no cuts to have to worry about fitting a new sink or toilet to exactly. Plus, you don't have to screw with having to cut arcs and crap in the tile.
AJS

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Tke up the baseboards as well, then re-install after tiling.

on
carpet
up
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: Tke up the baseboards as well, then re-install after tiling.
I used the tile as the baseboard....
http://tinyurl.com/2va3z
Enjoy your Holidays!
Rick
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Thanks for asking such a silly question. I am about to do the same thing in a small bathroom and had exactly the same question! So now I know the answer.

on
carpet
up
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