sill plate replacement in basement revisited

A little searching on the Simpson website led me to some anchors that may satisfy the inspector's requirement for anchor bolts on the new sill plate. http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/UFP.asp Simpson's site is full of code references, load test results, and corrosion data that should satisfy all but the most obtuse inspector.
But I still need an idea or two on how to lift/support a 12' section of the two story house where the joists run parallel to the sill plate. Like in the side of the house in the first picture here http://www.coolhouseplans.com/floor.html
Not one of you is clever enough to think of a way to do this?
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You aren't even smart enough to know how to use a newsgroup reader.
Try staying with your original thread.
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On Tue, 26 Feb 2008 06:24:48 -0800 (PST), Limp Arbor wrote:

This site states that the pressure treated sill plate is mounted directly on the bricks on the foundation. This is poor practice as a sill sealer is also required by code.
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Mike Dobony wrote:

Not here (UBC). Code states that material in contact with masonry must be pressure treated OR a suitable sill sealer must be used. Energy requirements DO require a seal between the bottom plate and the floor (regardless of whether it is masonry or wood) but this is done with either a suitable foam insert, foam sealant or caulk.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
  Click to see the full signature.
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I would do it with a couple of steel beams, cribbing and screw jacks. Maybe you don't have easy access to such, so perhaps this would be a good time to talk to a professional house mover. Those folks are surprisingly creative and often have spare time in the winter. IMO it will cost you less than you think. Good luck.
Joe
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Limp Arbor wrote:
SNIP HAPPENS

Depends how much you are paying for the advice.
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Many here, and especially those in the building industry, could not only think of a way, we could complete the job several different ways. Your answer is in the last thread, there are too many variables to give any advice without seeing the job first hand and even if I did see the job it would be wreckless and irresponsible to tell you how to go about it. Its that simple.
Not to insult your knowledge or capabilities but what you really need to be focusing on is that YOU cant think of a way to do it. It is foolish to think that you would attempt a project like this "blind" relying on advice given from strangers on the internet. It would be like thinking you could rebuild the engine on your wifes minivan over the weekend because last summer you successfully changed the spark plug in your lawnmower.
If your own knowledge cant get you on the path to completing the project its best to consult someone who doesnt need to ask someone else how to do the job.
Mark
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Limp Arbor wrote:

Bigass steel plates on bottom to spread load, steel beam on top to catch 2-3 joists, and cribbing and jacks in between. Call your local house moving company- they have all the tools, and more importantly, the expertise to use them without breaking the house or killing anyone.
Hey, moving that end of house half an inch straight up, is still housemoving. :^/
Seriously, this is a common job for them, and any company that does foundation repairs will know who to call.
-- aem sends...
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And this job is seriously complicated by the brick veneer wall to contend with. You really cannot lift a house 1/2" without taking it into the factor as it is attached to the house frame by many brick ties and will want to move with the house, possibly from causing cracks to failure of the brick wall.
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EXT wrote:

Yeah, that is a monkey wrench all right. Usually, for veneer brick in a house jacking or moving, they take down the veneer and just figure that as part of the cost. On a historic building, I have seen them remove bottom 2 course of brick, 3 feet at a time, and lag-bolt L-channel to the house to catch the upper brick. After the foundation work was done, they removed the channel and replaced the brick, or sawed the saved brick in half and covered over the steel. But that is a LOT of fussy masonry work, and would cost a lot, which is why on a modern brick-veneer house, they usually just take it down.
Only other way I can think to fake it, is to(after house is on jacks), saw the bottom mortar joint of wall on outside, shove steel T rail (upside down) in the crack, and jack that as you jack the house. Afterwards, pull the steel out and tuckpoint.
Rereading the above, it occurs to me that taking down the brick may be indicated anyway- if the sill is rotted, how did it get wet? Rotten sill behind brick on a brick ledge below sill level, indicates to me that the flashing and sheathing were not done properly. Brick is not waterproof, and if weep holes were blocked or omitted, the cavity between brick and sheathing may actually be collecting water. Sometimes, taking it all apart and putting it back together correctly, is the only long-term fix.
But, I can't see your house from here, so all this is just speculation.
aem sends...
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<snip>

Yes the non-existent flashing and abscence of weep holes contributed to the termite damage for sure. This will be fixed.
I do have an idea on how to do this and will probably try it if I can't come up with a better way.
diagram best viewed in fixed font (courier).
End view:
| | Outside | | wall | | Floor |_____| __________________________________|_____| ________________________________________| | | | | | | | | | | Temporary | | | | Temporary | | notched | | | | blocking | | blocking | | | | installed | | _________| | |__|_____________|__|____/ ____|__| | | | _|_______|sill Jacking | | | | | beam | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |__|__| | | Concrete wall
Kind of tough to draw the notched blocking the way I would make it but the idea would be for the notched blocking to tie into the floor joist and support each stud of the outside wall. The other straight blocks would keep the joist from twisting. The angle will be just enough to allow me to get in the new 2x6 sill plate.
I don't need to 'lift' (maybe a CH) the house at this point, just support it.
The floor above has tile in a 1/2 bath and linoleum in a laundry room so if I need to I could pull the tile and tie in some more support from above and even into the studs if necessary.
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No dice, keep trying. The result of this will be 0.0000" of movement at the outside wall and you will, in effect, simply shove the outer joist and sheathing right by the outside wall shearing it at the bottom plate. This would happen on a single story, vinyl sided house. Forget about brick. You will be unable to make a connection at the blocking/joists that will be anywhere near sufficient to raise the outside wall cantilevered a foot or more beyond. Additionaly as I recall in your OP you said the rim was rotted where does that repair figure in to this plan. Over and above, you are going to have to raise the structure substantially more than the CH you keep referencing. New material is thicker even with a 1 for 1 replacement, higher MC, high low spots, and so on. You may be looking at a CH from king kongs mama, something in the neigborhood of 1/16th would be the minimum and thats if the floor hasnt dropped at all due to the rot/ termites.
What is you reasoning for not at least getting a quote on this repair from a professional? You are already ahead of the game financially as you said you repaired a section with perpendicular joists yourself. You are potentially looking at comprimising the floor(s) above, the brick, possibly affecting windows and doors nearby, and the value of your home. It would at least be worth a couple phone calls.
Mark
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wrote:

The brick is only a veneer that runs 3/4 of the way up the first story and is resting on the solid pour conrete porch. The top of the brick is at least 1/2" away from the asbestos siding that is under the vinyl siding.
I Got an estimate from a foundation repair company for $3,500 to do the entire 40'. This was after about 20 calls that were not answered or contractors that "don't handle that kind of work". This did not include dealing with permits, sill sealant, or anchors that the building inspector wants. Their estimate was to replace damaged sill and install PT end blocking to reinforce the damaged rim/end joist. I need this permitted and inspected in case I ever want to sell because any repair will be obvious. I did get one other estimate from a local contractor to rip down the brick, do the repairs from the outside and reinstall brick for $8,000. I estimate that his estimate was way too low.
What I don't see is how you think the above method I suggest would raise the outer joist and sheathing and not the bottom plate. I could see the joist with the jacking beam under it raising and cracking the subfloor while the blocking broke loose but not what you suggest.
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Limp Arbor wrote: ...
rec.woodworking culled as this is nothing to do w/ woodworking...

Sounds like a bargain even if you have to work with them to handle some of the details--
--
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You are confusing your terms, your last sentence is correct. The joist you proposing to jack against in your ASCII "is" the outer joist. Outboud of that, under the outside wall, is the rim board/rim joist/ band. I call it a rim board when sitting on continuous foundation, and rim joist or header when not. Regardless, what I said was, "The result of this will be 0.0000" of movement at the outside wall". This means the outside wall, floor sheating, rim joist, and the sill, will not go up. All that will go up will be the outer joist you are jacking on, and the sub/finish floor above, inbound of the wall. You are basically shoving the floor up through the interior of the house hoping that the strength of your blocking (which there is none) and the floor sheathing (again none), will lift the walls. This will not happen. And again, even if it did, it doesnt facilitate changing the damaged rim. What _will_ happen is the floor sheathing will fail at the inner edge of the outside wall and for conversation sake if jacking continued it would simply tear the subfloor and finish floor free leaving the outside wall where it is. Jacking would become progressively easier and easier once the floor is torn free of the outside walls.
Mark
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<snip>

At least that part sounds good.
I get what you're saying and it makes sense.
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On Tue, 26 Feb 2008 06:24:48 -0800 (PST), Limp Arbor
The answer is clever.
Read Joe (thread)!
-- Oren
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Limp Arbor wrote:

Why lift?
The object is to replace the sill plate, not elevate the building.
Take out a 12" section (chisel? Sawsall?) and replace it. Move to the next section.
Where is it written that the sill plate has to be one big honkin' board?
Heck, there are houses that don't have any sill plates at all! (The most famous one was Dorothy's house in the Wizard of Oz.)
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