silent hydraulic garage door openers?

I'm watching Flashpoint and they want to open the garage door remotely. Will the hostage holders inside hear it. No, it's state of the art hydraulic.
Do they really have silent hydraulic garage door openers?
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wrote:

I doubt it. Hydraulics and cold weather can cause problems. Hydraulics would be more expensive. Hydraulic systems are not noiseless. Neither is the door. Not that it can't be done, but what would the advantage be?
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On Fri, 06 Mar 2009 22:44:21 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

If you were driving in your sleep, there'd be no noise to wake you up!
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I have been in the garage door/opener business for 25+ years and have never heard of such a thing. Thing about it you would have to have a hydraulic pump/lines ect. It wouldn't be economically feasible. Besides a new opener with belt drive is whisper quiet.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

What kind of cold weather are you talking about? I have experience with hydraulic systems that use a light silicone oil that tolerates low temperatures quite well. I know that hydraulic equipment used in the Arctic and Antarctic has a lot of trouble with cold temperatures but that's an extreme example.
TDD
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Around 10 degrees or below Fahrenheit.

And how do they tolerate it? They have to go to silicone or glycol based hydraulic fluids and then all the seal components of the pump and cylinder must use special seal materials rather than the standard nitrile seals. All this costs more and does not wear as well as the same system with petroleum based hydraulic oil in warm weather..

And I bet it wasn't a garage door opener.
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On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 09:05:28 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

You know it's never been 10 below zero anyplace I've ever lived. Maybe 3 degrees below zero once or twic. And that was 45 years ago and in the north half of the US. And if one day it was, I'm sure you could disconnect the door from the hydraulics. If they made hydraulic gdoor openers.

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I said about 10 degrees.............or below.
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On Sat, 07 Mar 2009 21:51:19 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Sorry. I changed my clocks to DST early, so it's hard to read now.
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

The hydraulic systems I referred to were designed to use the light silicone oil. The systems were used to open and close doors and gates. I'm sure the same manufacturers have designed around the same equipment for garage doors. I've worked on big swinging doors that were in industrial environments that were using hydraulic systems to open, close and lock. Vehicle traffic went through them. Hummmm, I wonder if it could be called a garage? All of the above mentioned equipment worked quite well in sub zero temperatures. In fact some of them were in frozen product storage and distribution warehouses. I'm sorry I don't know everything but I'm working on it.
You should read up on HYDREX Hydraulic Oil for extreme temperature ranges. I figure the Canadians would know something about low temperatures.
http://lubricants.petro-canada.ca/en/products/513.aspx
Texas Refinery Corp. produces a special low temp fluid that flows at -40 deg F.
http://www.texasrefinery.com/lb-speciallowtemp.htm
Perhaps aircraft manufacturers know about low temp hydraulic systems. They test them with temperatures from - 40 F to + 120 F. I wonder if The Space Shuttle has any hydraulic systems?
TDD
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Yes to hydraulic, probably not to silent. One I saw advertised was for a bi-fold door. That would be more appropriate for a big door like on an equipment shed. Hydraulics aren't noiseless. There would have to be some sort of pump motor and pump. Hydraulics on farm tractors are a bit noisy at first in really cold weather. It wouldn't be efficient to keep the pump running constantly. That would mean some sort of starter for the pump motor which could make a little noise on startup.
Dean
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Dean Hoffman wrote:

Not really...the hydraulics make less noise than the normal engine noise. "Silent", no, but not really any noisier in winter than summer.

Hydraulic/electric is the normal choice for such applications.
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Well, the show got worse as time went on. A big fancy house with indoor zones, by room I think.
Plus they could remotely disable one zone at a time, (which is true. My friend who owns an alarm company can do that from any computer, probably if it has the right software on it. ) But though the burglar/hostage takers inside, who planned to come when no one but the maid/accomplice was there were still prepared to monitor the zones, were monitoring the zones and would notice when one went off line, and though it takes several secodns to get through the door, the burglar would only see it for a split second and not realize what was happening, even though it happened to 3 consecutive zones.
But I still liked the show. I don't expect them to be technologically accurate.
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mm wrote:

What you want is rubber tracks and rubber wheels. That would quiet it down. The opener is not that noisy.
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mm wrote:

Air cylinders would be better than hydraulics for that application. You don't need hydraulic power to open a door. Plus air would work fine in cold weather.
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Most likely the brainchild of the show's technically illiterate writing staff......I'd put my money on "script requires it to exist" rather than exisitng in the real world.
In the process of opening a garage door (sectional, I assume) ............
How much noise comes from the opener, how much from the rollers & track?
Where does this "magic" hydraulic power come from? Hydraulic systems require a pump of some sort to run at some point and typically they're not silent.
cheers Bob
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fftt wrote:

Ya know, the doors could be spring powered open and hydraulic powered close. That way the rich guy wouldn't wake his wife after sneaking home from that little tryst. *snicker*
TDD
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