Signs of problems with drainage ???

I noticed recently that anytime I use my two bowl kitchen sink, the soap sods from one bowl leaks to the second bowl. Is this an indication of a drainage problem? I did not have this problem until the last few weeks of the old sink. I thought it may have something to do with the trap. I have just replaced the sink and all the pipes, but the problem remains.
Thanks.
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It could be that the union int the drains between the two bowls in the new sink is different than the old ones. Perhaps higher, or closer to the bottom of the sinks, or arrange different. This could cause the suds (assuming that's what the sods are you are talking about) to back up in the other sink.
Does the water drain from the sinks OK otherwise? If so, it's probably not a drainage problem.

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I had the problem with the old sink. I thought with the new sink and all the connections replaced with new pipes, the problem will go,but no luck. Everything drains ok except for suds. Its annoying to be washing dishes in one sink and rinsing it in the other with suds getting into the rinsed plates.
On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 02:52:26 GMT, "mwlogs"

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On 12/3/2004 8:44 PM US(ET), Malam took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

connected to each other before sharing a single trap? If the latter, the problem (it would seem to me) is that before the two sink drains get to the trap, soapy water in the wash side has a direct link to the rinse side. If each side has its own trap, the water in the trap of the rinse side will prevent suds from bubbling up in the rinse side.

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Assuming that they are tied together underneath the sink this condition would be normal. I pour an 1/2 quart of ammonia down each trap once an month. Fill the sink with hot water and then drain, letting the hot water run. Ammonia cuts grease and the full sink has more water pressure than normal. Recommended to me by an plumber friend.
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Can you do that if you have a septic system?
Banty
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On 11/29/2004 12:28 PM US(ET), Banty took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

kill off the bacteria that are necessary in a septic system.
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OK - thought so.
But what WOULD work?
Banty
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On 11/29/2004 3:42 PM US(ET), Banty took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

septic systems, or pull off the trap and use a snake in the drain pipe.
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Mechanically clearing the drain line with a snake. Put a bucket under the sink, take the P-trap off, and as much of the other stuff as you can easily dissassemble, and snake in both directions.
And henceforth, scrape your garbage into the garbage pail, and don't pour grease down the drain.
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