Siding for soffit and fascia

I own a brick rancher with wood trim, and am planning to install siding for the fascia and soffit. I also want to put siding on gables. House is 40+ years old; the wood soffit and fascia are in pretty good shape. My questions concern whether -- in a case like this -- the "one-by" soffit are generally *removed*, or whether the siding is "simply" installed over the wood. So, queries are:
(1) Should soffit be removed and completely *replaced* by a quality siding? *Or* should (most) everything be left in place, and the siding overlaid?
(2) If the best answer is to leave the wood in place, should the wood be refinished [like primed and painted], or at least some Waterseal or Spar Urethane be put on the wood before "siding it in"?
I have two straight strips to consider soffit-wise -- about 75 feet in front and back, reachable by ladder. I realize I will probably need to consider more vents somewhere. Also the soffits follow the pitch of the roof. Is it better to stay with that or box it off by nailing the j-channel level with the bottom of the fascia?
I also want to do the gables [which have triangular metal vents at apex]; but I assume that, in that case, I would finish the wood and then put on vinyl siding panels. The gables currently have wood siding. Can I install the vinyl siding directly over it?
I also haven't decided whether to go with vinyl or aluminum for the soffits and fascia. Any ideas on which one is easier to install?
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On Jul 17, 1:01 pm, snipped-for-privacy@msn.com wrote:

Your choice. Usually the aluminum is bent to cover the existing rake and fascia baords. Replacement boards made of PVC and cement can be installed but the cement-based still need paint.
You can install the vinyl directly over the existing wood siding depending on the overlap of the wood. In my last house I installed vinyl directly over cedar shake siding that only overlapped about 3/8". Sometimes the wood is covered by large sheets of foam to create a flat surface or furring strips can be used.
Venting will depending on the attic interior and whether sofit vents are practical or not. I think the current trend is toward sofit vent/ ridge vent combination. This depends on the construction details of your house.
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If the new everything is properly installed and flashed no water will ever get to the wood underneath.
In old construction most people leave the existing and simply cover it.
It is highly advised to cover any existing clapboard or other wood siding with the 1/4" foam backer board before installing the new siding. This provides a smooth flat surface for the siding and is well worth the cost. I have done it with and without and will never do it again without.. If you take the time to tape the joints is also provides a windbreak and has some limited R-value.
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

place, with Aluminum and not Vinyl, and F'd it up. Water got behind the cladding on the fascia, rotted it, ran across the soffit and into the wall by the kitchen window, and rotted the wall and window. I'm not a fan of covering wood with anything that can keep it sitting in water. If you simply MUST cover it up, be sure to have plenty of weep holes at the low points. I've seen good wood windows destroyed in a similar fashion by idiot siding contractors who skin the brickmold with coil stock formed on site, and actually route water down against the window frame. 'Maintenance Free', my pale gray ass.
-- aem sends...
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