Siding


Anyone know what the lap or clapboard siding is called that is made of a fiberboard like masonite? Is it still available anywhere to match old siding on a house now.
Thanks
R
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Hardiplank? http://www.jameshardie.com/homeowner/products_siding_hardieplankLapSiding.py
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Or perhaps GAF WeatherSide Fiber-Cement Siding:
http://www.gaf-weatherside.com/index.html
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

No, Hardie is what he should replace the old crap sawdust siding with. Somebody might still have some old stock somewhere, but he can probably match it close enough with Hardie (or a knockoff) that nobody will notice. I don't remember the name of the junk stuff either, but I do remember the court cases about it damn near killed the manufacturer. It was a Bad Idea from day one.
Old cheap landlord trick- strip one wall (like the blind wall on the garage) to get enough stock to patch the rest of the house, and then reskin that wall with the closest modern stuff you can find. (as long as corners have the vertical corner boards.) That vertical break line will make it harder to notice two different kinds of siding are in play, as long as the reveal is the same.
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aem sends...

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Masonite had a line of clapboard siding. My mother had the crap. I'm with you, Hardie is the way to go.

Don't know how that crap is going to hold up being taken off the wall. When I replaced the pine siding (with cedar) on my previous house I did one wall a year (outside season is short in Vermont ;). I used a solid colored stain so everything looked the same. Knowing what I do now I'd likely have used Hardie.
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http://www.google.com/#hl=en&source=hp&q=hardboard+siding
R
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ROANIN wrote:

How old is it? May be asbestos.
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Tony wrote:

who built this house was like the Johnny Cash song. " one piece at a time". Seems that one wall is real cedar, then this wall is the hardboard. Think I will just rip it all off and do it with modern stuff at some point as the stuff is actually in pretty good shape and under a porch roof.
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--- All I have heard it called is lap siding and 2 years ago it was still being sold. In the East a company called 84 Lumber Company was stocking it in most locations. I think the 8" is not available but the 12" is or was.
Colbyt
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Lowes still has the 8" single bead masonite siding. It will hold up if painted and properly caulked as needed. If you let the paint and caulk go a bit long it will start to affect the siding. There was a class action suit against it. It comes in 16' lengths.
There is a similar 8" single bead hardiplank siding that can be used to replace it. It's the concrete like stuff. The cost is slightly more. A 12' piece of the hardiplank costs about what a 16' piece of the masonite version costs. It's also harder on saws and breaks easier if mishandled. That's why it only comes in 12' lengths.
I have seen it mixed on a wall and you had to get real close to tell the difference. One cost saving trick is to use the hardiplank for the first dozen or so rows from the ground up and then switch to the masonite for the rest. The lower part of a house gets more exposure to water.
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