Shut off water when washer not in use?

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Hi,
A plumber told me that it's a good idea to shut off water from the washer when it's not in use because the flexible lines aren't rated to continuous pressure.
A. Is that true? B. Does the same apply to the gas line for the dryer?
Many thanks in advance!
Aaron
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Aaron Fude wrote:

Well, they ARE rated for continuous pressure, but do break. So shutting off the water is a fail-safe idea. Special valves are available for just that purpose - to make it easy to turn off the water.

It does NOT apply to the dryer's gas line (unless you're using the push-on rubber hoses that have been outlawed since about 1950).
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HeyBub wrote:

Hi, One thought, if you keep turing water on/off wouldn't it cause premature failure of hose by repeated expanding/shrinking cycles?
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Tony Hwang wrote:

Don't think so. The water in the hose will retain the pressure - unless it leaks, then you have a different problem.
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wrote:

Even with titanium hoses equipped with laser carved diamond fittings, you still have to consider that the inner plumbing and valves of the washer itself can fail. Shut the water off. Really.
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On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 06:33:45 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Do you turn off the water to your ice maker after the tray fills too?
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On Wed, 03 Sep 2008 07:13:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If I had an icemaker, the answer would be no. Of course, if you were intellectually honest, you would have admitted that there is a bit of a difference between the very tiny line to the icemaker, and the two large diameter hoses leading to the washer.
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I can tell you an icemaker story. A neighbor had GE service her refrigerator and right after they were done left town for 2 weeks. When she came back the house was flooded because the ice maker line had been damaged when the refrigerator was pushed back into position. The good part of the story is GE gave no arguement and paid to have her house repaired.... which was quite extensive.
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On Thu, 4 Sep 2008 20:37:51 -0400, "Art"

I don't doubt it. None the less, the icemaker line normally presents a far smaller risk than the two 1/2 inch washer hoses and the washing machines internal plumbing.
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On Thu, 04 Sep 2008 21:17:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

The difference is probably about 1/4th the water per minute but it is getting spilled in a lot more expensive place.
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On Thu, 04 Sep 2008 22:13:18 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

No, there are other differences that affect the likelyhood of simple failure, and your flow estimate is also wildly wrong.
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On Fri, 05 Sep 2008 06:35:39 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Why is it wrong? 1/4" pipe is roughly 1/4 the circular mils of 1/2" pipe. (some refrigerators are plumbed with 3/8" to get better flow out of "water in the door")
Since a large number of icemakers are hooked up with vinyl tubing and the fridge itself is plumbed with vinyl tubing I see that as a greater risk.
Cabinet bases are very susceptible to damage and replacing all the base cabinets in a kitchen will be up in 5 figures. I don't see where I am wrong.
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On Fri, 05 Sep 2008 11:36:44 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I can't help you then. Sorry.
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wrote:

Flow is a function of the Area. A= f (D^2) So if you double the diameter you get 4 times the flow. MLD
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Left the house without turning off the water!???? naughty, naughty.
s

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Dumb----Ask yourself one question--am I better off with the water shut OFF or ON. The machine shutoff valves are nickel and dime parts--Closure is made with a small plunger pushed by a spring that's probably exerts a force comparable to a ball point pen spring. Sure it works but to say that they never fail----Consider a small piece of contamination on the shutoff valve seat that starts out as a small leak that grows into a very big leak while you're off on vacation somewhere. MLD
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If the hoses are not rated for the pressure they must not be very good hoses. I am sure there are millions of homes with the hoses that never get cut off. There are some valves you can install to cut the water off when the washer is not in use or will detect a big leak and cut off the water. If I was going on vacation I would cut off the water going to them or to the hole house. I did have a hose to develope a leak while I was out of town one day. I now cut off the well pump (did not have that option at the other house) if I go off overnight or longer.
The gas line is only under a couple of pounds of presure. Much less than 10 pounds so you do not have to worry about that line breaking.
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My mother was visiting us in Arizona 7 or 8 years ago. We were sitting in the family room talking, and she started obsessing over whether she should have turned off the water in her house before she left. As I was telling her not to worry, we heard the sound of running water, and saw a widening circle of water creeping across the floor from the laundry room. The hot water hose on the washer had split. Of course, this did nothing to improve her frame of mind. I replaced those hoses with the braided metallic armored kind (available in the home centers), and got in the habit of turning off the water to the washer when we were going to be away for a while. Probably a good idea to change to new hoses each time you replace the washing machine. Fancy armored hoses can be more expensive than the other kind, but they are a lot cheaper than repairing the water damage from a leak that's been running all day while you were at work.
So, yes, those hoses can break. On the other hand, who knows what is worse for those washer supply hoses - constant pressure, or the pressure surge every time you turn the supply back on?
I can remember seeing an episode of "Ask This Old House" where the plumber guy installed one of those leak-detector shutoff valves on the laundry water lines - you might be able to find it on their website.
Another opportunity for leaks is the water supply line to the toilet. I had one let go at about 2AM, luckily in the bathroom right next to our bedroom, so I heard the water running right away. It wasn't actually the metal flex supply line - the plastic nut connecting to the bottom of the toilet cracked and split at the joint between the round and hex parts of the nut. Have since had 5 or 6 other people tell me the same thing happened to them.
Many recent homes here in AZ have the water supply split at the entry to the house. You can leave the water on to your lawn sprinkler system so your lawn doesn't turn brown when you're gone for 3 weeks in the summer - but you can shut off the main feed to the rest of the house. I have been been tempted to use that shutoff several times on vacations, but never have. If it's a concern, you might consider a bit of minor replumbing to install an easily accessible whole-house shutoff.
Kind of makes you want to go check your homeowners insurance for water damage coverage doesn't it? ;->
Jerry
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Jerry wrote:

My house was vacant for a while (we tried to sell it, but with the housing market the way it is, that didn't happen). The day after we decided to move back in, the toilet supply line in the master bath failed in exactly the manner described above. A neighbor noticed water flowing out of the house and called us. We have no way of knowing how long the water had been spraying out of that crack in the plastic nut, but all rooms were flooded but the two front bedrooms. All the carpeting and all of the MDF baseboards in the flooded rooms were ruined. The company that came out that evening drilled 1" holes in the drywall everywhere and installed 5 industrial-sized dehumifiers and about 20 high-power fans to dry everything out. It took a week. All the flooring had to be replaced except the ceramic tile, and all the flooded rooms were repainted. The total insurance settlement was about $25K.
All of this was caused by the failure of a part that costs less than $5 at Home Depot. For under $7 you can get one with a safety shut-off valve. Guess which one I bought. I replaced the toilet supply line in the other bathroom as well because the plastic nut on that one was cracked too, but hadn't started to leak yet.
Suggestion: inspect those things often!
--Steve
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wrote:

The neighbor across the street went on a 3-week vacation to come back to an ice-maker line burst. Ruined the carpeting, flooring, and basement ceiling, total $16K back in 1996. Insurance covered most of the cost, but nobody needs the hassle. Some folks turn off the main water supply before leaving for vacation.
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