Shower Tile Wall Collapse! Now what?!

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Check out my problem:
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After losing my balance in the shower and putting my weight against the left wall of the shower, the whole wall flexed. Uh oh. The tiles peeled off the wall like stickers, and there was little left of the original green board behind the tile, except, of course, for lots of nice black mold.
I've owned the house for just 10 months and this has been the biggest of my surprises.
I obviously have to redo the entire shower: three walls surrounding the tub plus the ceiling above the tub. I'm looking for suggestions as to the combination of materials to be used here. Special considerations go to the window (1-yr old full vinyl) since it is hit directly by the shower spray (what were they thinking when they installed this here?!). There is also a light in the shower ceiling.
Here's the current plan:
1. Replace insulation (studs seem to free from rot) 2.15lb roofing felt stapled over studs 3. 1/2" Durock backerboard 4. 6x6 ceramic tiles laid with thinset mortar
Obviously this is an oversimplification, but I just want to make sure no big steps are missing here, particularly with the moisture barrier. We just redid the entire kitchen right below this tub and I need to be 100% sure I am not going to get any leaks from either the walls or the window. I can't afford drywall repairs in the kitchen! So what part of this doesn't make sense or could be done better?
This will likely be a DIY project, although I may split the work with a local tile guy who has done small jobs for me before. I would do the demo and hang the new board. He would do the tile install. With little tile experience, what are my biggest challenges?
Thanks for any help! It's a small bathroom, but a big pain for me!
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Damn! I feel much better now about my leaky tub faucet, and stupid wallpaper that the previous owners should never have installed in a wet area!
Although some of them are tacky & ugly, there are some ready-made shower wall systems that look pretty classy. Have you explored that option yet, just so you're sure you don't want it?
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WirelessNut wrote:

<SNIP>
Leaving the tiling problems aside,
1) Any chance that the window could simply be eliminated? It seems to defeat all the effort that will go into a new tile job.
2) Give some thought to providing grab bars. Lay out a plan for them. Then install suitable bracing between studs to bolt them to.
If the soap dish had a built-in grab, get rid of it.
3) As long as the wall will be open, consider replacing the 3-handle tub control. If you're perfectly happy with it, OK.
Jim
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Jim,
I didn't want to bore everyone with ALL the details, but we will replace the three-handle with a single handle control.
Scrapping the window is probably not an option, since I can't get into the exterior work required to flll the hole right now. It's an old Cape Cod with asbestos shingles that we'll eventually replace, but my home equity loan is maxrd out, so where not going there!
Doug,
We thought about a surround, but the nice ones are as much or more than the materials/labor for the tile job, which will look nicer.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Ack! I used to have 3-handle controls and loved them; our new (built 2000) house has a single round control. Given similar pressure on the water line, it lets less water through to the shower head, and the one we have doesn't even give flow control. It's either on or off, you just get to choose the temp by rotating it.
"Pressure / temp balance" technology has never appealed to me. Even though I have a toddler, and understand the safety considerations, I still feel the original design is a better one.
Marc *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
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You can still find single control faucets with a lever instead of a round knob. That gives you much finer control over water volume.
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On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 13:18:17 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Mine's push/pull to control volume, and twist for temp.
I'm not sure I understand how you COULD build a mechanical faucet that doesn't have variable volume, much less why anyone would.
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It's probably the most common type these days.
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As minerals build up in either kind, I think the round ones become harder to control. You tend to pull or push harder, which can result in larger changes in volume. The lever type is easier to control.
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WirelessNut wrote:

light in.
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There are pricey temp adjust controls available today, you set the temp with a LED readout and it stays there forever provided theres enough hot water.
I was told there about a 1000 bucks, costly but how often o you replace a shower faucet? with the temp preset how much water / sewer/ heating water energy will you save in a lifetime?
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The temp presets are there for safety, not to save money on heating water.
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First you need to: 1/. Get a dust mask for working around the mold or call a professional(better option, but more expense). 2/. If you have air exchange shut it off or the mold spores will lodge into it and you'll need to clean that out as well. 3/. Seal the doorway before starting any work.Heavy plastic will be fine. 4/. Remove any and all contaminated material and material you'll be replacing. 5/. Clean the mold from the studs as well as anything else that there is mold adhering to. 6/. Reinsulate and vapour Barrier. Be sure to seal the edges of the vapour barrier all around with tape or sealant. 7/. use concrete board for the walls in the shower area, it's more expensive then drywall but it's made for the area. 8/. Get the roll of waterproof sealer and attatch to the walls for extra waterproofing. 9/. Proceed to tile to specifications.
Hope this helps.

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Where in the sandwhich would the "roll of waterproof sealer" go (as you mention in #8)? On top of the concrete board? This is in addition to the roofing felt, yes?
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You shouldn't use roofing felt on the inside of the house. It is a tar product. The roll of waterproof sealer is what you will need.

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backerboard, in place of the roofing felt. Nothing should go between the tile and backerboard except the thinset or mastic.
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Actually the waterproof fabric goes over the backerboard to prevent water from hitting the backerboard and is attached using thinset. Thinset is then used on top of that to attach the tile. It completely waterproofs the area from water penetration due to leaks and spills. It would go over the walls and across the floor if the floor is tiled.Every join would be overlapped causing a completely sealed area. Roofing felt is an exterior product and should not be used inside a dwelling.
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wrote:

Drop a couple of mothballs in the wall cavities, to keep the mold/mildew beat back after you seal it up.
While you've got the wall open, let in a backer-board for a real grab-bar, so you don't have to worry about finding the studs, later. -------------------
This is not a suggestion, it's a question: Why roofing felt instead of plastic sheet, under the backerboard?
--Goedjn

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1) Replace the window with some glass block and tile right up to it without a ledge. 2) I've used 1/2 plywood with a coat of mastic glue (to seal it) with great success. THis leaves the option to install a grab bar anywhere you like.
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Mount a safety bar right to 1/2" plywood? Might work, but it's easy to envision a situation where it would not.
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