Shower safety grab bar

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On Fri, 29 Jul 2016 21:06:48 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Suction cups are a joke when it comes to something made for safety. They might work ok for a small gadget in the car, or a lightweight soap dish in the bathroom. NOT for a safety device that may be holding 200lbs of human body.
You're better off with NO grab bar, than one that is going to fail at the wrong moment!
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On Fri, 29 Jul 2016 22:12:24 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

The suction cup itself is not the problem - it is the mounting.
Suction cups are used on a daily basis to carry and install glass -both automotive and architectural.. Very heavy glass. It is what the suction cups are fastened to that worries me..
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On 7/29/2016 10:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Have you used one? What is your experience? Do you know what it is intended to do?
They perform a particular function very well
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On 07/29/2016 10:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

So true! Looking around I'd say that the majority of Walmart shoppers tip the scale at over 300 lbs.
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On 7/30/2016 7:00 AM, Ted wrote:

A good majority of Walmart shoppers are more than likely minimum wage or below earners, and they need to buy stuff where ever they can afford to shop.
The less money a person makes the less they can afford nutritional foods, so they have to opt for high calorie/fat/carb foods because those foods are cheap. The more money people earn the more likely it is that they will buy and consume food that is better for them, less fattening, and more nutritious.
--
Maggie

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wrote:

All food of the future will be factory made from Vitamin and Nutrient enriched extruded styrofoam pellets containing artificial flavor and color. Farmers will no longer be needed, so everyone will spend all their time playing computer games or using Facebook on their smartphones, except for those who work at the Styrofood factories.
This "future" will occur by the year 2025.....
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On 8/3/2016 2:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Darn. I guess all the time I've spent having my own organic gardens was time spent in vain! ;-)
--
Maggie

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"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
On Thursday, July 28, 2016 at 9:02:31 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

...and that's where I'm not sure I agree with you, so let's just agree to disagree on that point.

The OP is not having a "difficult time". He is simply asking questions and voicing a concern. In fact if Clare is right, he's a few screws away from completing the job.

Are you kidding me? Are you implying that people need to spend $15K to go from a suction cup bar to a screw in bar? Of course "not everyone has that option" but that's not the only option. In fact, it has nothing to do with the conversation.
I don't know what is big deal I have install two SS grab bars in two of my showers Cost perhaps less then $100 bucks. Yes tiles are hard as glass, but use of proper tools there are no problems.

Good grief. I'll say it one more time and then I promise to give up because you are obviously not listening. I'll even put this on it's own line so there's no chance that you won't see it.
When I *need* a bar, I'll put in the type I want.
Here, just in case you missed that:
When I *need* a bar, I'll put in the type I want.
How's does that equate to "prefer nothing or my way"?
I prefer nothing *now* because I don't need a bar. I never once said that I would forgo a bar when the time comes that I need one. I also prefer not to install a wheelchair ramp to my front door because I don't need one. I also prefer not to rip out my bathtub and put in a walk-in shower. Guess why?
Yup, *I don't need one*.

Yeah, you keep saying that, all the while ignoring the main point of my objection to suction cups. So be it.

No, it's not - not to me. That's what you keep missing.

See Ya!
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DerbyDad03 posted for all of us...

+1 I think this project is beyond his knowledge, now who is going to tell him?
--
Tekkie

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wrote:

It's WAY beyond the knowlege of over half the respondents.
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On 7/28/2016 9:04 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I'd certainly want to have something solid if my life depended on it. I was thinking of minor assistance. How's this grab you? http://www.wayfair.com/Grab-Bar-GB380-NDRR1067.html
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On 7/28/2016 7:09 PM, Frank wrote:

Bar design is good. All depends on the adhesive and how well it is applied. Good adhesive can be very strong and support a lot of weight, improperly installed, no so much.
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On 7/28/2016 8:15 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I read some reviews and some could not get it to stick. I'd be a little leery myself as while adhesive tensile strength can be high shear strength is usually lower and since boundary levels may be very thin a small crack might become a big one.
I looked at my wife's suction support and it was very tight. I'd almost be afraid I'd pull a tile off the wall before it failed. Obviously the strongest bar would be screwed into the studs but I think I will buy a suction one for use in may ceramic stall shower as I would never put full body weight on it but might brace to soap a foot or something where a little support is necessary.
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NEVER. The plastic liner will never hold the handle securely enough for ANY kind of use.

And the suction cup would pull the acrylic liner off the wall - absolutely NO WAY in this situation. Just screw it into the studs behind the wall. The only way it could be an issue is if the "drywall" behind the plastic or acrylic liner has gotten wet and dissapeared due to a leak./ Even them the ONLT way to have a chance of it working is to screw it into the studs.
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On Thursday, July 28, 2016 at 7:07:23 AM UTC-4, slate_leeper wrote:

install a 3/8 board between the wood wall (stud) and the plastic shower wall m
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On Thursday, July 28, 2016 at 9:12:59 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Not a bad idea, assuming access is possible.
I'd have *really* hard time doing that in one of my showers (not even sure that I could) and it would be impossible in the other shower without opening up the wall.
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wrote:

Grab bars normally have escutcheons to cover the fastening plate. One could...
1. drill holes maybe 1/2 - 3/4" smaller than the escutcheons, preferably a bit smaller than the fastening plates too
2. slip piece of ply through the holes so they pack out the space between studs and enclosure. They would need to be secured in place either with small screws or glue.
3. level off the holes with thinset or putty or caulk
4. when the leveling material is dry and cured - 3,4 days - attach the grab bar fastening plates. The escutcheons will cover all.
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You guys are all overthinking stuff. I'll bet the backer is OK on the studs and the plastic is only 3/8 of an inch away because the glue used to mount it let go. Just pull the plastic back against the backer board/drywall/whatever by screwing the shower bar to the studs and tightening the screws. That's what I did on mine. The acrylic liner is loose on the backer board in several places - the shower bar "fixed" where the glue let go when I installed it.
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|I would like to install safety grab bars in the tub/showers of the | house I just bought. However I found that when I press on the side of | shower wall, the plastic (fiberglass?) is about 3/8 inch away from | the wall. I am afraid installing the bars and squeezing the plastic | tight to the wall will cause it to break. Any suggestions? |
Don't use anchors. You need to support a person of 200+ pounds grabbing it suddenly, at an angle, to support their weight. If you can't find a spot to install it into studs you'd be better off not doing it. Then, at least, people would know what they're dealing with. It sounds to me like maybe you should get rid of the plastic/ fiberglass and retile. Another option, if you really don't think you can screw through the plastic:
Find the studs, drill pilot holes, then pump in something like epoxy resin or Bondo, to back the screws. You can later drill through that. At worst you might have to cut a larger hole to do that and end up with a patch that doesn't look so good. But maybe you could put something like a decorative disk or washcloth hook in that spot.
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On Thursday, July 28, 2016 at 9:19:11 AM UTC-4, Mayayana wrote:

re: "then pump in something like epoxy resin or Bondo, to back the screws."
I assume you mean back to the *studs*.
I would not trust Bondo to hold a 200 person grabbing it suddenly.
I know the Bondo wouldn't be doing the actual holding, but if it flexed and cracked, there would no longer be any support behind the wall, just a gap. Things will move, walls will crack, people may get hurt.
Maybe, just maybe, epoxy would be better, but it would take some finesse to get just the right amount of epoxy in there and keep the wall flat. i.e. no concave or convex area - and completely filled. The fact that he would be pumping across an open area adds a bit of complexity to the project. Now, if he could lay the shower on it's side, this method would be easy-peasy. ;-)
I find it strange that the shower wall moves 3/8" inch in the first place. That would drive me crazy!
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