shower head

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Recently (maybe 6 months ago) I replaced my 14 year old moen shower head with another moen shower head. When I first replaced it all worked fine but now I'm noticing some streams of water thru the head go in another (slanted) direction rather than straight. I live in a hard water area (Houston suburbs) so I expect this is the cause. I've seen in the past saw tv commercials to solve this like using CLR. I'm hesitant to believe the commercials so I ask here. One thing, I have gold metal trim on this shower head so I don't want to hurt the gold trim (perhaps shiny brass??). Suggestions?? Thank you.
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Ask Moen customer service for advice.They know the product, limitations, likely solutions, too.
Joe
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Not a bad idea Joe :)
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Several years ago, late 70s, I picked up a set of little drill bits and a pin vise. They came like this sold as a tool for cleaning to acetylene torch tips. I have found a thousand uses for them. Being an electronics technician they received the most use cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards.
Jimmie
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re: "I have found a thousand uses for them"
Please list them.
Thanks.
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Cleaning the calcium from the shower head with vinegar is the best DIY remedy. Have you done any other plumbing jobs in the past six months? Loose debris in the line may be part of the problem, as well. Flush the shower head, in reverse, to remove any loose debris. With the head off, run the water (hot & cold) to flush the pipes, too. Lightly tap on the pipes, if you can, to further dislodge any debris... . anything visible come out? I suppose your house has some age to it..... plumbing, too?
Sonny
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On 1/23/2012 5:03 PM, Sonny wrote:

2nd that. I always flush the pipes before installing a new or cleaned shower head or aerator.
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On Mon, 23 Jan 2012 13:17:49 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Use 1 Use 2 Use 3 Use 4 . . .
You can probably complete the list yourself.

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wrote:

An old joke with those who hire is about "experience." As in 18 years experience. Is that 18 years experience or 1 year of experience 18 times? Same could go for those little drill bits. If he had said "I've used them a thousand times" nobody would have said a peep.
--Vic
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Use 2 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 3 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 4 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 5 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 6 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 7 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 8 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 9 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 10 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 11 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 12 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 13 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 14 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 15 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 16 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 17 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 18 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 19 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 21 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 22 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 23 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 24 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 25 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 26 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 27 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 28 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 29 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 30 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 31 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 32 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 33 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 34 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 35 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 36 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 37 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 38 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 39 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 40 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 41 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 42 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 43 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 44 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 45 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 46 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 47 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 48 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 49 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 50 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 51 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 52 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 53 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 54 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 55 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 56 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 57 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 58 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards. Use 69 cleaning solder out of printed circuit boards.
(to be continued.......)
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On Mon, 23 Jan 2012 20:49:14 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

I missed a couple here.. what was Use 20 and 59 <grin> ?
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Saying "I've used them a thousand times" is very *very* different than "I've found a thousand uses for them." Very different.
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news:e15ef1f7-9dbd-4093-b054-> Several years ago, late 70s, I picked up a set of little drill bits

I use them to ream out the holes in the burners on my gas grill and used one the other day to clear a clog in the nozzle in the windshield washer on my car.
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Got a link to them? I want some. What are you chucking them in?
--Vic
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A pin vise. Looks much like oe of those bit holders for the miniature screw driver sets except it has a chuck that opens up and closes down just like the usual 3/8" drill.
Most peoplel use tip cleaners for torch nozzles and I have used one to clean the car spray nozzles.
Do a google for pin vise. You'll get lots of sources for both the vise and drills, mostly in sets.
I forget what the name is for those drills. Wire size drill bits?
Hawrry K
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On Tue, 24 Jan 2012 07:41:33 -0800 (PST), Harry K

A #60 to #80 set is probably what you're after. Diameters are from 0.0135" to 0.035". The biggest problem is losing them!
--
croy

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wrote:

I already ordered this set.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Never heard of them before. Used to put together model kits, mostly ships. Just used nail clippers, a nail file and exacto knife to trim up pieces. But I've got a flaky gas burner here, and these might work to clean it.
--Vic
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I usually soak my shower heads in white vinegar after I've heated it on the stove for a few minutes. I don't know if it helps to heat the vinegar, but since warm water seems to clean better than cold water, I'm thinking it can't hurt.
However, I've also seen suggestions where you put a plastic bag with vinegar around the shower head - without removeing it from the pipe - and letting it soak over night. Seems almost like more work than just taking the shower head off and sticking it in a pot.
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Yes, that's what I decided to do for the time being. I'll see how it goes tomorrow after 24 hours soaking. My next approach will be to use a paper clip in holes if needed only. Thanks Oren... your help here and earlier posts are helpful ... thanks!!
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Paper clip might be too big.
I've used a sewing needle in the past.
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