Should I try to install tile in my master bathroom?

Page 2 of 2  
snipped-for-privacy@ubisoft.com says...

Sugar and water? Hadn't heard that one. I've found that the green kitchen Scotch-Brite pads work pretty well for cleaning the haze after it's dried. Of course one wants to get as much up as possible before it dries, but I never seem to get that part right. There are also additives one can add to the rinse water to help cut the haze.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keith Williams wrote:

vinegar and water at a certain point - two hours? two days? after the grouting was done. I recently redid the grout in our walk-in shower, so took particular care since it is a problem that appears often on ahr. Not difficult at all to remove the grout. Just don't let the darn stuff dry, and if you use unglazed tile, I believe they need to be sealed before they are installed. RTFL.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Best tip I saw was to take a 5-gal (Joint Compound) bucket and a large car washing sponge. Immediately after grouting, dunk the sponge, ring it out well, and wipe a stripe one sponge width wide. Go over it twice, once for each side of the sponge. Dunk the sponge, squeeze it out, and do it again. Be sure to use a light touch so you don't wreck your nice smooth grout.
This take a large portion of the haze off before it has a chance to dry. A few hours after that, use cheese cloth to buff the tile.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
webnba wrote:

the tile on it. As others said check Home Depot for their two hour class on laying tile. Well worth it.
The guy there said to put the hardibacker down with galvanized roofing nails. I thought I would do better and use self countersinking screws. After trying about four of them I gave up. No way could I drive into that hardibacker. I went to the nails. Once that is down you won't get tile coming loose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <_hy%f.12094$1q4.4990@bgtnsc05-

I've always used the 1/2" because my floors are only 3/4" OSB. A minimum of 1-1/4" subfloor is recommended for tile.

Use a countersink drill bit to drill pilot holes. Also, there are specially treated screws meant for HardiBacker with nice robertson or square-drive heads (I can't tell the difference).
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keith Williams wrote:

That is what I was trying. My driver just wasn't strong enough. Concluded that with nails every six inches it wasn't going anyplace anyway.
Just don't lay over linoleum. A neighbor did that. One came loose. When trying to replace it they all came loose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 14 Apr 2006 03:03:21 +0000, Rich256 wrote:

You need a better driver. ;-)

Someone tried to convince me to just leave the vinyl flooring. My answer was "how's the thinset foing to stick to that?". I scraped it all up and then sanded the glue down.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@homerepairlive.com says...

No one does the first time. I've now done two bathroom floors, the laundry floor and walls, and a couple of closets. I have the master bathroom left to do as soon as it gets a little warmer.

As others have said, you really need a wet-saw. I bought one a few years ago and use it often. Harbor Freight has what looks like a nice one for a good price (significantly less than I paid for a smaller one):
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber46225
There are cheaper ones there but IMO you do need a wet-saw. You'll *easily* save enough on the first job to pay for it. That's how I build my toy^h^h^htool collection. ;-)
It's a big job, but it's certainly within the range of a DIYer. If your house only has one bathroom things might be, um, interesting for a few days. ;-) A bathroom floor takes me about a week (I'm slow ;).
- One day to remove fixtures, tear out old flooring (unless it's tile, then it's month ;) and prep. Maybe spackle the walls. - One day to do the setup, cut the backer to size and maybe install a sheet or two. ...perhaps paint the ceiling. - One day to finish the backer and tape it. Plan the tile cuts. Plenty of time to paint the walls (easy before the tile goes in). - Two to three days to lay the tile. I like work backwards from the door to the wall far. If everything works out the cuts can be hidden by the base molding rather than being exposed by the saddle and tub. This means I only do as much as I can step over (3-4'), at least the first day. Since I don't do this every day I also don't want to do it tired. I tend to make stupid mistakes when I'm tired. - A short day to grout and clean up. - And a short day to reinstall the fixtures. - I plan so I can seal the grout the following weekend (an hours job but the grout should set up for several days before).
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Re haze: I have very little tiling experience, but my bro is a pro, and I've helped him on a couple jobs. Bucket and sponge as posted above is correct, working diagonally tp prevent pulling out grout. He emphasized to me the importance of keeping sponge clean- rinse _a lot_ and change water, wring out, wipe, repeat. Go over whole floor a couple times. Cheesecloth as mentioned above. Should be no haze.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.