Shotgun house - type of construction ???????

I was watching House Detective on my local HGTV channel.
They inspected a house in New Orleans called a SHOTGUN HOUSE. No problem since I am from Louisiana and know about them.
However the inspector said, " When you see the window and door frames sticking 3 inches INTO the room, it is an example of __________ construction. There are NO 2 X 4s in the walls, etc."
I was unable to catch the NAME of this type of construction. I had never heard of it before. I Googled "shotgun house" and got no info.
Anyone know what TYPE of construction this is ?? Just like we say STICK framing or BALOON framing, what type is this ???
TIA
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Shitty
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In Hawaii it would be "single-wall" construction. House made without 2X4 but with 1X8 redwood. Pretty much phased out now but plenty of examples still standing.
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Post and beam construction often looks like that. They also do pole buildings that don't have the typical framing, but I don't know if they used that for homes; more often barns and garages.
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sticking
are
Box framed construction is the term I think you are looking for. Built just like an old wooden box.
Colbyt
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On 04 Nov 2004 18:57:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com.mado (Conase) wrote:

Single-wall may be the term you're looking for, though I didn't see the episode. Basically one-by planks make up the wall, interior and exterior surface being two sides of the same board. Common in a lot of mid-1800's temporary or worker housing, though I doubt there's much of it left in most areas. The ones I've seen now have surface-mount electric added, but rarely heat/air or other amenities.
Jeff
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sticking
are
I went to the HGTV web site and they listed Brett Zamore as the guest architect on the Shotgun House episode (OHR-112). By email reply, Brett said the following in response to your question:
"It's been a while since that episode was filmed. I don't understand the quote...but the type of construction is purely a wood frame construction on pier and beam. There ARE 2x4's in the walls..and wooden lath board that covers the 2x4's for stabilitly and strength."
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OP here >>>>
WOW, thanks for the followup.
I did not tape the episode since I was home and cancelled the taping. If I had taped it, I would be able to replay it to check it out.
On the program, the inspector said there were NO 2 X 4s in the wall and I "think" compared it to PLYWOOD for the wall which was not invented back in those days.
Thanks for the followup.
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Were 2X4's common in the civil war era? That's when the house that was on the episode under discussion was said to have been built. I saw it too and remember as the OP did, that it was referred to as some type of different construction technique, but the exact term escapes me too.
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Chet Hayes wrote:

I remember the This Old House episodes of a "Shotgun Double". I remeber hearing the term there as well.
After I DAGS, I found this http://www.latech.edu/tech/liberal-arts/geography/courses/310/text/folk_housing.htm
Hopefully something will ring a bell.
Brad
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Hi, It's called box construction; it was practised from the 1880's onward. Usually an effort to speed construction and save $$ on all those pesky studs, plaster, etc. 1x12's were nailed directly to the rim joist and to a top plate. All the structural integrity relies on the shear strength of the nails. In box houses I've examined, the clapboards are nailed directly to the sheathing, and the inteior was hung with muslin and then wallpapered (repeatedly). These houses were problematic to wire (think wiremold) and of course were only suited to warm climates beacuse there was no place for insulation. They could be built in any single-story floorplan, with rather complex rooflines. They can be retrofitted with studs if the structure is not too far gone. The typical example will be 100 yrs old by now... Casey

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