Shopping for a snow blower, maybe.....

Page 3 of 5  


Sounds like the start of a business plan.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 06:31:38 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This is all true, except for the part about "not completely filling the tank" (that depends on how much gas it takes for the job). But no matter how careful people are with this stuff, no one is always able to, or remembers to do all the stuff we're supposed to do. After spending a few hours out in the cold blowing snow, the last thing I want to do is poss around with draining gas or adding additives. And it's almost a guarantee, that once Spring comes, few prople even think about their snow blower.
It's the same (in reverse) with lawn mowers, chain saws and warm weather gas engines. I know for fact that if I spend a day cleaning up fallen trees after a storm, the last thing I want to do is piss around with my chain saw gas when I'm done. I just want dinner and a couch or bed to relax in.
Many people know what we're supposed to do, but we're not all human and facing life's challenges. Details like this are forgotten or postponed until it's too late. It's too bad these engines cant automatically drain their gas and flush out their carbs after use, but that's not available or practical.
I personally prefer a sturdy (no maintenance) electric snow blower and the same for chainsaws, weed whackers, etc. As far as lawn mowers go, I still use gas engines. Chopping up cords is part of the reason, but I have to mow far beyond the length of most cords anyhow.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 07:03:29 -0800 (PST), bob_villa

My father had a gas powered snow blower. In warm weather we'd check it, and it would start right away. We would add gas stabilizer, drain it, and all the stuff required. As soon as it came time to blow snow, the damn thing would never start. It almost seemed like it was made to not start in the cold.
He had that thing in the repair shop numerous times, we rebuilt the carb more than once too, plus changed the spark plug and other stuff. About all that thing seemed to do was waste money, while he and myself shoveled snow. That's when the rest of the family, bought dad an electric snow blower for Christmas. It worked well, and always ran when needed. He used it for years, until he was no longer able to clear snow (due to his health). Then I used it, until it finally burned out, years later. I'd probably have one now, but I have a farm tractor with a loader for snow cleanup. About the only thing the tractor cant do is the porch and a 15 foot sidewalk. I just shovel that little bit....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 9 Jan 2015 11:21:25 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You call this living?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 14:19:07 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I agree. I like my electric chain saw, my electric lawn mower, electric weedwacker, electric hedge trimmer, electric drill, electric saw, electric radio. I never change the oil or fill them up with gas, or change the spark plug or pull the cord, yet somehow they start.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 08:27:27 -0500, Frank

You think running over the newspaper makes a mess, you want to see what happens when you run over your tire chains!!!! Had a customer have that happen the end of last season - took out both shear pins, and wrapped the cain around the impeller so hard it snapped the drive belt. Took me about an hour to get the chain out this summer.

Around here (southern Ontario) Shell premium fuel still has no ethanol in it. All I ever use in my small engines - and the Yamaha has a fancy fuel shut-off valve that allows you to drain the carb and lines with a simple twist. I fill the tank and drain the carb when I put the blower away for the summer. The mower has a simple fuel shut-off and I just run the carb dry when I put it away.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 06:31:38 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

most jobs to add fuel ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 14:32:57 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

on the ether can. When it's cold I give it full choke and a little whiff of starting fluid and it starts on the first or second turn.
Some of us really NEED a 2 stage blower, so electric is out of the question, even if we were willing to take the chance of chopping up the power cord. Electric snow shovels are fine for small sidewalks, porches, and decks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 14:19:07 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

air-space means no condensation and therefore no water in the gas. Also means less surface area exposed for evaporation. Ive seen too many tanks left empty or almost empty for a year at a time all rusted inside - and the rust dust screws up the carb real good (and eventually the tank rusts through)
I store my equipment with the tank full (of non ethanol gas) and the carb drained -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

if the engine has enough power to do any damage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Per snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca:

My rig is 100% gear-driven and it has made me a believer in belt drives, which look to me to be:
- Vastly lighter
- Less expensive
- Nowhere near as noisy
--
Pete Cresswell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Jan 2015 17:17:48 -0500, Stormin Mormon

lazier he didn't get the slo[p shovelled, and it froze. That's why he wants a blower.
It was above freezing here today and everything turned to slop. Dropping to -20C overnight, so I got out the snowblower (AKA the "slop pump") andgot rid of all the crap that was going to turn into rocks and "road turds" overnight. The old Yamaha can blow water 20 feet!!!.
If I had not gone out and moved that crap it would have become an awfull icy mess overnight. (It will likely still be bad enough in the morning - I didn't blow the whole block!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/12/2015 6:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'm not a "he". I DID get the driveway shoveled every time it snowed last year. The reason for shopping for a snow blower is to keep the drive clear and PREVENT it from becoming an ice berg. :o) 8" of wet snow is heavy damn stuff and I don't need back aches!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Jan 2015 19:09:07 -0500, Frank

valve in-line.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

free. The low octane dtuff is E5, so that makes the mid premium E2.5
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 11 Jan 2015 16:00:20 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

When I had a '67 Pontiac Catalina with a 385ci engine, it often woudn't start in cold weather, so I drilled a hole in the fire wall and and made one in the glove box, and ran some thin clear tubing from the glove box to the carbureter, with a short piece of polethylend tubing at the carburetor end of that.
The other end went on a can of ether in the glove box. After that I never had to get out of the car, and the car started every time.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Per snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca:

The engine is mounted on a transmission that drives the wheels and has a PTO. All implements attach to the PTO:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qwaJ1lhhYI

The idea sounds pretty good but the implementation is strictly Release 1.0.
It's like they designed it, put it into production, and never fixed any of the inevitable design bugs - like the starter handle getting wedged in the engine protector cage (which could be cured by moving one of the cage bars a quarter of an inch) or the dead-man switch with wires running outside where then can snag on brush... and a disconnected wire just quietly disables the dead-man function until the operator finds out the hard way....
Also, in spite of the idea sounding pretty good (only one engine to maintain....) the reality is that you can, for instance, get a pretty-good snow blower for less than the thousand dollars they get for their single-stage snow thrower attachment whose housing rusted out and failed completely after about five years of use....and whose replacement housing was made out of some cheap metal that actually *tore* when it rubbed up against an obstacle...and wasn't even primed before being painted.
Probably more than you wanted to know..... -)
--
Pete Cresswell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Same reason I bought a REAL snow blower. If you live where you get 8 inches of heavy stuff do yourself a favour and don't even CPONSIDER a single stage or electric blower. Get a Honda, since the Yamahas are not common and the quality and engineering on so much of the other product out there is suspect. Get hydrostatic drive too - no slipping friction drive when that wet slop gets into the machine - and track drive gives traction without chains to fall off and get gobbled up by the blower (and to rust) and no tires to keep going flat.
The Honda WILL cost you more than even a Troy-Bilt - but you seldome get more than what you pay for.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'll bet you lunch at your favourite restaurant you never owned a 67 Cat with a 385 Cu Inch engine. You might have owned a 66 with a 389, or a 67 with a 400 but The "Iron Indian" never had a 385
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.