shop window insulation

I'm thinking to cut to fit pieces of 2" polystyrene for my shop windows for use in the winter (east and west) and summer (south). These are double hung windows with a good 2" recess where the foam should fit in fairly well.
Other than it being 'pink' - it should be about an R10. One sheet should cover 3 of my 4 windows and hopefully significantly reduce the amount of hours on my electric heater.
This is for my "office-side" of the insulated shop. 23x11 with a 220V heater. Four 34 x 44 windows.
I was also thinking to spray adhesive aluminum foil to one or both sides (sun exposure side in the summer).
The sheet was $24 and should be enough to cover 3 windows.
Thoughts?
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where are you located? fire safety?
cheers Bob
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KS
While it's a fire risk, I don't seem to have any real fire sources to ignite the polystyrene.
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where are you located? fire safety?
cheers Bob
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I've done it, and it works fairly well. Unless you are much better than I am with a knife, you may want to consider cutting with a circular saw or table saw, much easier to get straight cuts. I'd forget about spray adhesive, almost every solvent eats that stuff, 2 sided tape perhaps.
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It works to save energy but dual pane glass can crack from reflected energy, I painted foamboard black and put it in a window, it not only cracked the single pane glass but the low winter sun melted the foamboard. I was suprised and realised that for days I was smelling the sun melting the foam. I removed it and took it outside, even at about 10f out the flat black paint got the panel to near 95F. I used brown paint and was ok, the black realy absorbed the suns energy. Some Window Manufacturers have in writing using cellular shades can void a warranty. If they are dark shades, sealed on the sides they do crack windows when then sun hits them. I guess when its below zero out they warm up to fast when the sun rises and the dual panes expand unevenly. A lighter color is better, but research it more if yours are dual pane. I even saw the foam board melt outside in 10f, a suprise. The low winter sun and snow reflection has alot of energy.
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Interesting..
For winter I'm trying to insulate. For summer, insulate and reflect back the sun's radiant heat. In the winter, I'll leave the window clear to absorb the radiant engergy.
So I was going to somehow apply aluminum foil to one side and direct that inwards in the winter and outwards in the summer.
I should have enough material to do 3 of my 4 windows: winter - west, then east, then 1 of 2 south (on overcast days and at night) summer - 2 south and then west (to block direct sun)
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It works to save energy but dual pane glass can crack from reflected energy, I painted foamboard black and put it in a window, it not only cracked the single pane glass but the low winter sun melted the foamboard. I was suprised and realised that for days I was smelling the sun melting the foam. I removed it and took it outside, even at about 10f out the flat black paint got the panel to near 95F. I used brown paint and was ok, the black realy absorbed the suns energy. Some Window Manufacturers have in writing using cellular shades can void a warranty. If they are dark shades, sealed on the sides they do crack windows when then sun hits them. I guess when its below zero out they warm up to fast when the sun rises and the dual panes expand unevenly. A lighter color is better, but research it more if yours are dual pane. I even saw the foam board melt outside in 10f, a suprise. The low winter sun and snow reflection has alot of energy.
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You also may get a lot of condensation on the inside glass.

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I got condensation when I did it, then mold.
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Good point -- I'll likely be keeping an eye on it. The foam should fit pretty tight snug into the window frame. We'll see.

I got condensation when I did it, then mold.
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Had the same idea, but to cover storage room windows on the upper floors where I don't need sunlight. I'd cut the panels 1/4" or so undersized and cover the edges with foam weatherstrip tape for a good seal. You might want weep holes top and bottom to prevent overheating or condensation.
Replace the foam with black painted plywood, and you've got instant solar panels to further cut the load on your heaters.
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