Shoddy shed shingling

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AFAIK, our shed has been in place for 20 years or so: it was here when we moved in 7 years ago, and I think it predated the previous owners,
I had bought new shingles already but hadn't installed them yet, but after last week's Midwest storms it was obviously time to tackle the job.
The first thing I found was that they had started with a row of shingles turned upside down, which I had just read is the worst of the three common ways (and illegal in some jurisdictions), best being to use a special starter strip (which I had already bought) and next best being to use shingles the right way up but with the tabs cut off.
Next I found that none of the protective strips over the adhesive had been peeled off!
I am assuming that this was a "kit" shed, but I have no idea whether it was the vendor (or the vendor-contracted installer) or the earlier homeowner who erected it.
Perce
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Percival, the upside down starter shingles are quite common and normal. Ice shield is fairly new. The tape is there to keep the shingles from sticking together in the bundle. DO NOT REMOVE the strips.
It does not sound like there is anything inferior about the shingle job that you had.
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DanG
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Common and normal, perhaps-- but incorrect.

I'm with you here.

20 years on a shed ain't bad-- so though it was 'inferior'- it was good enough. the install outlasted the product.
Jim
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Been awhile since I shingled (15 years?) but I think the instructions printed plainly on hte bundles say to do it that way or use starter strip.
I should buy a bundle just tohave those instructions for this discussion that pops up _every_ year.
They should print in BIG, BLACK, BOLD LETTERS " Read the frikken instructions" on each bundle.
Harry K
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-snip-
-snip-
If you lived in a windy area you would have found that out in less than 20 yrs. As it is- the shingling might not have been up to code-- but it was good enough to outlast the shingles, eh?.
Jim
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wrote:

The upside down row is known as a "starter strip" and is actually very common, anf you'd be surprised how many roofs have been installed without peeling the sticky strips (which is NOT the right way)
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On Nov 1, 7:35pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agreed, the upside down shingle starter is very common - as is sketchy roofing - but it is not the preferred way to do it. Starter strip is sold in rolls, is cheaper than shingles, makes it unnecessary to worry about starter/shingle edges lining up, goes up faster and it has the adhesive at the very edge right above the drip edge, which is where the wind frequently catches shingles and rips them off. With heavier architectural shingles the wind is not as much of an issue, and with self adhesive membrane lining up starter/shingle edges is of lesser importance, but the other benefits are not as easily dismissed.
http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/roof/maintenance/reshingle/install_1/asphalt_1.htm http://www.gaf.com/Roofing/Residential/Products/Starter-Strip-Shingles/ProStart-Starter-Strip-Shingles/Documents/Pro-Start__Sell_Sheet-228-934-v1.pdf
R
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Smacking myself in the head. I've done/helped on a couple dozen roofs over the past 40 years. I've always properly cut tabs for starter shingles on the eaves--- and then *tarred* the gable ends!
It never occurred to me that those same starter shingles would be a much less messy way to handle the gables.
Jim
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On Mon, 1 Nov 2010 20:50:44 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

Buit 30 years ago starter strip (ice dam) was not common (at least up here) and for small jobs you would not want to buy a full roll - which is the only way it is available in many markets.
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On Nov 2, 2:10pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Starter strip has been available for more than 20 years, which is what the OP was asking about, it was available in 3' bundles before rolls became common, and before that every single bundle of roof shingles had instructions on how to make and install starter strip out of 3-tab shingles.
Starter strip serves several purposes, all of them relatively important, but the OP has little reason to complain or question the installation of his shed's starter course at this point. He had to rip off the roof to discover the 'problem'.
R
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On Tue, 2 Nov 2010 11:31:22 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

My point exactly. The job was definitely done to the "good enuff" standard.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes it *is* common. It is also one of my pet peeves. The whole purpose of a starter strip is to keep the end row of tabs from flopping in the wind. Old bundles used to explain how to cut some tabs off and make your own starter strip- with the little blobs of tar out on the edge where they'd do some good. [new ones might, too-- but I haven't read one in years]
But so many idiots couldn't figure that out- and contractors wanted a faster way, so they make bundles now with the tabs already removed.
Putting the shingle upside down leaves the sticky spots where they do no good at all. The 'starter' strip does nothing but bulk up the eaves and waste time.
Jim
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wrote:

The reason for the starter strip is to provide continuous coverage at the edge of the roof, where the tabs would normally leave gaps, and to provide a full double layer coverage like on the rest of the roof.
A bit of roofing cement handles tacking the tabs down on the first row.
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On Nov 2, 2:13pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Post corrected. You make it sound like you believe that the starter strip is not for adhering the first course tabs, when all of the instructions for making your own starter strip, and the starter strip rolls have adhesive on them. Why is that?
That little dab of roof cement thing - do you put the dabs down while laying the shingles, or do you lift each tab after the shingles are installed and insert a dab? Why?
R
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On Tue, 2 Nov 2010 11:25:17 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

On a shed roof, if the bottom row tabs are not stuck down it is a simple matter to just stick a caulking gun or a stick up under each edge tab and stick them down. We are talking what/ 8 feet per side? That's how I did mine. No starter strip in the shingle bundles - and ice guard only came in 100 foot rolls. I only needed 30 feet, so I flipped the first row of shingles and nailed them over the 15 lb roofing felt, then shingled the roof. The south east side sealed perfectly, the north west side (prevailing wind too) I stuck down with bulldog cement - about a dime sized daub under each tab.
15 year shingles - about 13 years ago, so might need to redo it in a couple years. The installation will outlast the product, for sure.
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On Nov 2, 9:33pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The self-adhesive starter strip rolls are 33'. http://roofing.owenscorning.com/homeowner/accessories/rollroofing /
Two questions. Do you use the same upside down shingle method on larger roofing jobs, and why do you not follow the manufacturers' instructions on cutting off the tabs, particularly if you're just going to have to add adhesive?
R
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On Tue, 2 Nov 2010 21:27:08 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

Why waste the time and effort cutting off the tabs, when they do no harm left on? On a house, you "might" see a ridge about 6-12 inches up where the thicker under-section stops. On a shed?????
On my house it has 15 lb felt over the whole roof, ice guard up the ends of all the gables, and 2 runs of ice guard on all the eaves, covered with 25 year fiberglass shingles, as well as galvanized drip edge, all the way around, under the ice guard.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
-snip-

Cause if you put the shingles on right- so the tar holds the next row of shingles down- the tabs will be out flopping in the breeze.
Jim
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On 11/1/2010 5:35 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

What's the diff?

Only shingle job in my experience, the instructions were to NOT remove the strip. The strip is to keep the shingles from sticking during storage, I believe.

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On 11/01/10 05:53 pm, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

Since they hadn't peeled off the protective film over the adhesive, it didn't make much difference in this case. But the adhesive on that starter row ends up closer to the edge of the roof if they are installed the right way up.

Yes, of course, but the shingles are supposed to stick together when they are in place on the roof, aren't they? Otherwise, why have the adhesive at all?
Perce
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