Shingles have been flying off my roof...problem?

Greetings,
100 year old colonial in MA, over the past couple of years I have noticed more and more roof shingles landing in my driveway...evidently the idiots who installed the roof only used two dabs of glue to hold the shingles in place...It has two layers, and I am probably missing about 25 shingles. There are no leaks in the house and I can see no ill effects.
Should I look into roof replacement or simply repair, and if so, what time frame? Any danger in leaving the roof the way it is since there aren't any issues yet?
Thanks,
Bluesman
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Roofers dont use glue, how old is the roof, what was the shingle warranty. If you are loosing them something will need to be done.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote in message

Its glue, man - that's why there are all falling off...Two blobs of it on the back of the shingles and that's it. No nail holes anywhere. The roof was done way before I bought the house, inspector said 15 years old when I bought it in 97. Clearly the 3 stooges installed the roofing int he early 80's.
What if I had some meatball get up there, replace the lost shingles, and nail in the existing shingles?
Bluesman
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On 13 Apr 2004 09:38:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (Bluesman) wrote:

When shingles start to fall off, it's time to schedule a roof job. Have the old shingles removed to limit the weight and consider adding ridge vent for more ventilation.
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Bluesman wrote:

How long since the last roofing job? BTW shingles are nailed on and the mastic that binds the tabs of the top shingle to the one under it is not generally put their by the roofer, but it comes one the shingles. Spring and early summer are good times to put a new roof on as the heat of the summer sun activates that mastic.
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Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Our condo had a new roof installed in early '97. The roof is complicated, with two mansards over each wing, and flat roof sections in center and between mansards. The condo board elected to use Elk Prestique Plus shingles on the mansards. They started falling off as soon as they had been installed (winter, Florida). It became evident they had not been nailed on the nailing line, and there is only a half-inch overlap (laminated) between the nailing line and the edge of the lower layer). After several call-backs and major re-do's, it has slowed but there are now, still, two loose shingles up there. At some point the city added to it's building permit inspection process the requirement that tabbed shingles on mansards have adhesive added under the tabs, in addition to normal nailing. So...... in rare cases it is appropriate, when you choose a bad product to install, the adhesive is used. The roof formerly had concrete tiles, lots of soffit vents but only a small , square vent on top of each mansard, and was not designed to have shingles. Most homes in our area have tile roofs, and the neighborhood association wants to make tile required.
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Ahh, a steep mansard? It's always been dotted with cement in my experience. That, and more fasteners per shingle. Sounds like the installers missed the proper nailing area? Tom Someday, it'll all be over....
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NorMinn wrote:

I think I would go with tile there. I expect it will cost more to start, but last a lot better. Too bad the original guy did not take the care he should have under the conditions.
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Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

There were long term leaks, open seams and corner rot on sections of fascia. At least two structural repairs at corners since roof was installed. Long term, an entire new roof should have been considered. They should have done the fascia repair at the same time the roof was done, so's they could get it open and see what they really had. Three unit owners are chronically late in monthly assessments, and were board members. Best choice would have been tile, IMO. The shingles are ugly on our roof, choppy pieces that interrupt the pattern. I had never seen instructions for cementing tabs on mansards until I saw it on the city's website. The contractor was a large, established company and allegedly had several roofs develop problems like ours at the same time. Elk's website had same installation instructions as the package, and I don't recall ever seeing the advice to cement the tabs. The contractor has been excellent about callbacks and did two fairly major reworks looking for all the problem shingles. The had used regular shingles for the ridges, but took them all off at the board's request and put on ridge shingles. The building was styled for a tile roof. Problem areas seem to be those that get most sun exposure. Looks like crap.
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First of all, when the enlightend poster above, said roofers dont use glue well he's right and wrong. We use many differnt addhesives but only to secure certain tiles on a tile roof, caulk nails, or to fix some crews jack ass mistakes.lol. well now on too a few ideas ! if you have the money available to get a tile roof then take your knock and learn from it ie. (when getting a roof installed you can pay for an inspector to inspect the roof at specific intervals or after installation is complete,or go down and get a list of building codes specific to your roof have at time bid and insist they be follwed ohh and watch at least 30-45% of work maybe even ask to see the condition of you sheeting).ok now if you dont want to buy a whole roof and they cant help you fix it right. ashpualt shingles can be tared,mastiked,caulked lol "glued" but that wont fix potential leaks .I would use roofing cement a 3 gal can,one caulking gun w/ three tubes of the same cement, a 5 gal tank of propane w/ good torch,go to the attic if you have one,simply look for wet or water staind sheeting if you have any drive a 2 to 3 inch nail at highest wet point, anywhere but next to chimnies,skylights, and long stretches or of wall to roof flashings flashing areas need to be inspected from the roof lol most crews that lack proper ethic would LOL "glue" hear so look for that as well. now the spots where you may have nailed up through the sheeting and underlayment need to be inspected and replaced.from the nail up at least 2ft needs to be replaced i would go higher and at least one shingle width in each direction.note shingles installed in winter or cold/windy conditions should have at least five nails driven flush not high or sunken/overdriven And the shingles come with there own glue opps i mean tar on them so if it is cold and high wind any new unheated/ shingle will simply blow off lol . now dont mess with any flasings at all 97' is getting old professional help is needed cement every thing that isnt staying down.then take your torch and use at full throttle be carefull start on any dormers/or main valleys and heat the shingles 1or2 at a time just until they steam take your foot ,the backside of a hoe whatever you can coneup with to compress the shingles at the nail line even if they didnt nail there lol. these efforts may be fruitfall.I personally could fix just about any leak with henrys 208 alone, but I preffer not to. good luck
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