Shingles, Composite, Adhesive strip

A high, wet wind blew off a half-dozen shingles or shingle parts the other day. A roofer came out and replaced what was necessary. Another high, wet wind blew a day later. The replaced shingles were virtually standing on edge (like speed brakes on a jet plane). After taking a peek of things, I conclude:
There's a supposedly adhesive strip applied by the manufacturer to the top side of the shingle, running length-wise edge to edge, sometimes not solid but rather dashed (as in a dashed line).
This supposedly adhesive strip is probably made out of a tar-like substance. It's certainly not sticky at 65-degree(F). And there's certainly not enough of a bead to satisfy my Electronic Engineering sense of building construction.
So how long does it take for one shingle to adhere to the one below it, or, at least, what's the best approach to preventing the lifting of "not yet sticky enough to adhere" shingles?
(Sacramento Valley, California)
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If you're talking about common asphalt shingles, the question isn't a matter of that sticky stuff adhering one shingle to another in a windstorm. The question is how well the standard 1-3/4" roofing nail will hold those shingles down to the roof in a windstorm. If the shingles stayed put, science did the job you asked it to do.
If I recall, and I may be wrong here, the stickum you refer to is more a preventative measure to keep moisture from being blown and carried beneath the shingles and onto the roof structure itself.
AJS
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scribbled this interesting note:

The adhesive strip is only there to prevent blow-offs. It requires only a little while to activate if it is a warm, sunny day. Here in North Texas in the summer it is almost instantly adhesive. In other parts of the country and in other climates a few sunny days with temperatures in the mild range (that is, fifties to sixties) will suffice.
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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Brian Smither wrote:

Needs to get hot sun. Reason it's not good to reroof in the winter. Brand new roof?
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