Shingles - 3-tab vs. "architectural"?

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billy101289 @ gmail.com, while unnecessarily full-quoting a 6.5 year-old usenet post, wrote:

Why are you google-gropers so dumb as to be posting a reply to a 6-year-old post?
And did anyone else here notice that billy's post, even though it was posted from google-gropes, was not double-spaced. ?
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On 7/14/13 7:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Very interesting that you responded to a post I put up 5 years ago!
Actually, I put off doing the roof 4 more years. Had it done in 2012 - I had the roofer put on the architectural shingles.
I was wondering how good the job was overall, then we had the tropical storm Sandy blow through. Other houses on the street had their shingles ripped up, but the roof I had put on held tight.
The old roof had one layer of wooden, and at least two layers of asphalt up there (I though there were only two layers, but the guys doing the roof said "three"). The last job had been done on the house in the year (or years) preceding 1978. The old roof lasted from 1978 until 2012 - 34 years. It was getting pretty bad in spots, though. Some of the "skip sheathes" were rotting over the garage. Luckily, I had some 1x4 lengths of pine from an old model railroad table I built in the 1970's, used them for patches where needed!
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How long are you planning on living in the home?
If it just a few years, as compared to someone who is 40 and planning on staying for rest of life, that can change your plans.
given the wild weather were getting I would go with the waterproof membrame over the entire roof, just or safetys sake.
definetly get the chimney with loose bricks rebuilt, with a new chimney mortar cap.... otherwise rain can get between the liner and bricks and when it freezes break the liner and have it fall in and block the flue.
you dont want any loose bricks hitting your nice new shinglers in a storm...
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On Wednesday, January 23, 2008 11:33:13 AM UTC-7, John Albert wrote:

ave me an estimate mentioned something about "Timberline" or "Timberlane" s hingles as what he regularly used. Not sure of the name; I have found a web site for Timberline shingles but not for "Timberlane".I had previously been considering what are commonly called "3-tab" type shingles (I was interest ed in them because of their "lay-flat" look), but he recommended that I NOT use them, because they have a limited lifespan when compared to other type s of shingles.I _think_ he was referring to what are called "architectural" type shingles. He said they'll last longer and come with a better warranty .Would anyone comment on the longevity of 3-tab vis-a-vis the "architectura l" type shingles? Was he telling me the truth?I'd also like to ask about sh ingle COLORS. I'd prefer a charcoal or darker-colored roof, as the houses o n either side of me are grey and brown. Just something different.But I was wondering about shingle color and heat transfer. Will a darj roof "absorb" considerably more heat from the summer sun? Or does it make little differen ce? If heat IS a factor, I'll choose a lighter color. (Note: my attic has i nsulation installed underneath the rafters, pretty well-wrapped)Thanks,- Jo hn
I recently built a workshop in the backyard, which was permitted and inspec ted by the city. When it came to shingling the roof, the city recommended Architectural style shingle, since they have a longer life span. They also required that I had to use 6 nails (instead of 3-4)for high winds. They a ctually came out and inspected it for the 6 nails.
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