Shingles

I need to put on another layer of shingles. Asphalt and fiberglass shingles sell for the same price. Does anyone have an opinion on which is better for re-shingling?
Thanks, Dave M.
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When you say another layer, how many layers are there now? If it is more than one, don't try adding another. If fact it is really better to tear off and get any old problems out of there.
As far as the choice, it might be helpful if you tell us where you are. Washington State is far different than New York and they are different than Arizona or Florida.

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Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Joseph,
I have one layer of asphalt shingles at the moment and am in North Carolina. So what's your opinion, asphalt or fiberglass?
Dave .
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On Thu, 1 Nov 2007 08:12:43 -0400, "David L. Martel"

I would definitely go with steel shingles if you are looking for an easy DIY re-roofing material. Especially in a hurricane region. You dont have to take the old asphalt shingles down. You can buy steel shingles on ebay: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item )0174749827
just make sure you dont get screwed by this seller (see previous thread for details). Also, you can contact these wholesalers:
bestbuymetals.com, metalroofingwholesalers.com, metalroofingsource.com
or mfgs: accelroofing.com, custombiltmetals.com, edcoproducts.com, follansbeeroofing.com, kasselwood.com, kasselandiron.com, kasselandirons.com, metalsales.us.com, decra.com, metroroofproducts.com, metalsusa.com, allmet.com, zappone.com, tamko.com, steeltile.com, met-tile.com, nordmantile.com, interlockroofing.com, futureroof.com, loomismetals.com, paradigmshingles.com, reinkeshakes.com, raremanufacturing.com, vailmetal.com, vailmetalshingle.com, permatileroofing.com, westform.com, & manymany more.
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Just my experience: I reshingled proffesionally back in 1998. Not one contractor (out of 5) would quote me fiber glass shingles. Everyone told me they didint hold up to Chicago's climate. Now its 2008, new house, and I have to do some patching. I go to a big box store expecting to buy Asphalt shingles. Not one store carried them. All Fiber glass. I suspect which is better is going to boil down to whats sold in your area.
wrote:

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Still in Chicago? Could it be the difference is based on weather conditins and one works better in cold and the other in hotter spots?
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Easy way to find out on code? Call a contractor, tell them what you are proposing, ask them to price out any work if you find you have more than just some reshingling needs (like I needed 2 plywood panels replaced so we ended up doing most of them as cheaper then and didnt have to deal with it later). As long as you are honest and tell'em you plan to do it yourself but want info if you find worse damage, they'll be happy to help over the phone with general info.
It was 8 years ago and we were told 90$ per panel for the good wood and 150$ each to replace. Plus haul away fees. We ended up having the whole thing done professionally because we couuldnt find a match for the old roofing shingles. (and of course the new shingles and it's install added more cost) Your price may be higher as ours was part of a package deal to also reside the house with vinyl.
Sorry, I do not know which type of shingle is better, but your codes *probably* are fine with 2 layers as you are just south of me so same overall construction. If there would be a difference, I susect it's that we have to account for snow here too (weight on roof), so we may be a little stricter on number of layers?

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Being in NC (I was in Fayetteville for a bit), be sure they are AR (Algae Resistant) shingles. Black algae just thrives in the humidity there.
Never did get hit with a hurricane when I was there. Lucky. Highly recommend not using staples (if it's even legal where you are). Use nails and consider the "high wind" nailing pattern recommendation of the mfgr (greater than 4 nails).
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Joseph, I'll add to your post that in my area at least, codes do not allow a 3rd layer. Norfolk area, storm related issues. We arent 'hurricane alley' but we get hit often enough. It's that and the weight which can cause major long term damage I am told.
A DIY job by a fellow down the street was 3 layer and the random (1-2 times a year) inspector caught it and made him take it all off. He got fined too but I dont know how much. He hadnt known it wasnt allowed here (good fellow actually) and said '3 was ok where he came from' which leads me to believe this varies.
"Joseph Meehan" wrote in message .

Origional was:

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on 10/31/2007 7:14 PM David L. Martel said the following:

http://www.bobvila.com/HowTo_Library/Asphalt_Shingles-Asphalt_Shingles-A1464.html
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Willshak,
Thanks, that was the help I needed.
Dave M.
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Your question doesn't make sense. Both fiberglass and organic mat shingles contain asphalt. From your perspective either one will work fine. Fiberglass has a slightly better fire rating. Make your choice based on appearance and the life of the warrantee.
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David L. Martel wrote:

Asphalt shingles are either asphalt reinforced with fiberglass or asphalt reinforced with cellulose (organic), but I've heard of some being made of asphalt reinforced with polyester.
The Aug. 1997 Consumer Reports found that organic shingles always did very well in freeze-thaw tests, but a few fiberglass shingles did, too, including GAF Royal Sovereign.
I'd much rather have fiberglass shingles because of their much better class A fire resistance rating. There have been some residential fires where the fire spread along class C asphalt-cellulose shingles but stopped right where the class A fiberglass shingles started, in one case in a Houston apartment complex. Class A isn't just a slightly better than class C; it's a lot better.
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