shingle roofing

Ok stupid question here but oh well......
I am doing a flat angled roof (not A frame) and want to shingle it. I cant figure out how to start at the top of the flat angle with the shingle because the place I would nail to would be exposed. Throw me a bone here!
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"Flat angled roof"? What's that? How about you look here: http://www.roofhelper.com/typesofroofs.htm?source=types and use a more common term.
I think you're talking about a shed roof, I'd treat it as standard ridge, only where the pitch on the other roof is vertical. Nail a drip edge up, wrap the ridge cap shingles over the top in the traditonal manner, dapping some roofing cement over the last nails you put up..
John
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Im doing a shed roof. Looking at the page you sent lets say I started laying shingles at the south west corner of the roof displayed on the page. The problem or part I am missing is once I get to the north or top of the roof for the last run of shingles do I just nail them up and put cement over the nails leaving the part that normally tucks under the next row exposed? I googled what ridge caps are but it appears its used on the first row or low/south side of the roof.

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Check out how ridges are normally shingled. I'm thinking that doing the same thing at the top of your shed roof, with one side of the ridge shingles going down to a drip edge should do the job: essentially you'd be making a slatbox style roof with a vanishingly small short side.
John

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Gotcha, Thanks everyone.

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Bryan wrote: Im doing a shed roof. Looking at the page you sent lets say I started laying shingles at the south west corner of the roof displayed on the page. The problem or part I am missing is once I get to the north or top of the roof for the last run of shingles do I just nail them up and put cement over the nails leaving the part that normally tucks under the next row exposed? I googled what ridge caps are but it appears its used on the first row or low/south side of the roof
Shingle up as far as necessary to allow your flashing to cover the top shingles' nails. Cut the tops of the shingles even with the top of the decking. The flashing will be a piece of bent aluminum or copper or whatever, nailed to the top row of shingles at or below the exposure line. The remainder of the flashing will be bent (on a brake) over the ridge. It should hang down enough to prevent wind-driven rains from penetrating. HTH. Tom
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Bryan wrote: Ok stupid question here but oh well......
I am doing a flat angled roof (not A frame) and want to shingle it. I cant figure out how to start at the top of the flat angle with the shingle because the place I would nail to would be exposed. Throw me a bone here!
Why would you start at the top? Please re-state your question using different words. Sorry. Tom
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Bryan Martin wrote:

http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/roof/index.htm
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