Shingle or Roll roofing question

Hi Everyone, I have to help a friend shingle a small garage roof in a couple of weeks. The problem is that there is a little addition to the garage that runs the length of the building, 20 feet, and sticks out about 6 feet. The roof of this addition is a very low pitch, perhaps over the 6 feet it rises 1 foot where it meets the original garage roof.
I was thinking just too lay tarpaper and then regular asphalt shingles, but, would roll roofing work better in this situation? It has been a long time since I’ve shingled, and I’m not really looking forward to it, sigh. Thanks for any opinions,
John.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jdmst wrote:

I thought this question was asked about a week or two ago. Did you not get an answer?
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joseph Meehan wrote:

Hi Joseph, Perhaps it was, I'll try and seach for the replies, but not by me.
Thanks for the hint,
John
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm no roofer. House here in Florida where there's absolutely no standing for freezing water or snow has paper and shingles but the paper is one upped heftier in weight and overlap is a tad more. If it accumulates leaves or any branches its likely to dam and over time dirt will build up under shingles eventually making life interesting cleaning up under those tabs & tricky to find leaks.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.