shimming door hinge

This does not seem right to me -- but it did resolve my issue.
I have an exterior door that the door used to be 'cocked' a bit in the frame such that the weather seal did not seal well all around the door. There was a gap along the bottom of the latch side. The botton latch side of the door needed to be lifted about 1/8" to make the door fit better into the frame. I added a shim to the bottom hinge -- pushig the hinge out about 1/8". It's a nice fit all around now.
I did some checks to see that the frame was perpendicular and it checked out ok (plumb bob). I did not chech to see that the top of frame was square to the sides nor that the bottom was square to sides, but visually, the door was just not "square" inside the frame. The bottom hinge side ( the hinge I shimmed) fit snug to the frame, while the top hinge side was 3/16" open.
To me, it seemed that the hinges were allowing slightly more or less of an opening between the door and the frame - almost like the hinges were not the same.
This is a Jeld-Wen exterior door.
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It sounds like the hinge-side jamb has twisted. To fix it: * Take the door off the hinges. * Remove the casing (the trim around the opening). * Remove the screws holding the jamb to the rough opening (or saw through the nails if that's what's there). * Put tapered shims behind the hinge points to cause the jamb to be vertical and square. Use a four- or six-foot level and a good square. * Drive long screws through the hinges, though the shims, and into the 2x4s of the rough opening. Leave them a little loose so you can adjust things. * While you're in there, you might as well do the same thing to the jamb on the knob side as well. * Double-check that the top and bottom of the opening are equal. * Put the door back up. * Make sure the opening on all sides is consistent. You probably can't get it back to the factory condition, so just get it as close as you can. Also check that it doesn't swing open or closed by itself. This would be an indication that something isn't plumb. * Drive all the screws down tight, and check everything one more time. * Put the casing back on, fill nail holes, caulk edges, and paint.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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I initially thought the same thing, but now I'm really thinking the issue is with the hinges themselves. It's like the top and middle hinges don't close together as closely as that bottom hinge?
I was about to undertake the procedure you outlined (but thanks for detailed instructions in case I need to do this), but when I look down at the hinges, the bottom hinge plates are closer together than the middle and top.
Ah.. but I just took a measurment from hinge side frame to lock side frame. At the top it measures 36", at the center, it's 36-2/16" and bottom it's about 36-3/16", so it's spreading out top to bottom. Sounds like I need to do the procedure afterall. At least for now, it seals up better.
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I had a door with that problem, try picking up door at outer part where handle is.
mine had worn hnges after a gazillion opening and close cycles. if theres slop hinges are bworn. how many miles on your vehicle?> this is a test for odometer accuracy too
now I oil hinges twice a year:)
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have found that OP's problem can usually be solved by longer screws in the top hinge, on both sides. A lot less work than stripping the casing. The short crappy factory screws that come with a prehung door are almost always junk, and work loose quickly. If there is a shim behind the hinges like there is supposed to be, I like the screw to reach all the way over into the stud.
-- aem sends...
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On Tue, 6 Jan 2009 13:50:18 -0800 (PST), coloradotrout

Sounds like the jamb is bowed. When is was installed and over fastened it pulled the jamb inward towards the RO studs. Use a level on each side jamb and both sides of the stop. See a difference in space behind the level?
If it's bowed like you mention then pull the door casing off and gently pry the jamb out where need be to remove the bow. Shims may be needed...
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Yeah.. looks like when weather warms up, I'll be pulling off the interior/exterior trim and truing up the frame. That should give me an even snugger fit.
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