shelf life in stored fuel?

Quick question.....would High grade (premium Grade) unleaded gasoline have a longer shelf life than just Regular unleaded gasoline.... all will be kept in plastic 5 Gallon 'Jerry Cans".......will one be better than the other for storage?
...Thanks in advance for replying...Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
All I can tell you is that I have started cars that had sat for over a year with unleaded regular gasoline in the tank and, once started, they ran quite well. Hope this helps!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HiTest will not last any longer.
Generally it is suggested that metal containers will work better for long term storage.
The most important thing is to use a fuel stabilizer in the fuel. It self destructs and these products reduce the rate of destruction.
Unless you really have to store it, I suggest not trying. It is difficult to predict how long it will store. Generally one year is the max you can count on if properly stored. Two years will usually work, but it will likely be starting to show problems. Three years no matter what you do is pushing it.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some new blends get 6 mo even with stabil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (mark Ransley) writes:

The gums that form in fuel are from bacterial action. Sta-Bil is an antibacterial agent that inhibits the growth of that bacteria. If fuel is an alcohol or MTBE blend, it draws moisture out of the atmosphere and will grow bacteria even if stabilized. That is why the new blends won't store as long. Many areas only sell oxygenated fuel part of the year, so you can extend fuel storage by buying non-oxygenated fuel.
Generally the larger the tank the less contact with the atmosphere, so fuel will last longer in a large, full tank than it will last in a small, partially full tank. Any storage can should be tightly sealed for maximum storage life. Most cars have sealed fuel systems, so the fuel will store well in the gas tank. Older vehicles will draw moisture in a vented gas tank. If the fuel in a tank is doubtful, you can pour a can of carb cleaner into it to keep gum deposits to a minimum.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You are right, but I would like to add that bacterial action and even the problems of evaporation are not the only problems. Sta-Bil also acts to slow up the chemical actions of free radicals that help make big chains from small ones and are a large factor. But you are right about the new fuel blends and that should be taken into account as well. I will even add that buying the fuel from a name brand station that does a lot of business is a good idea as it is likely to be fresher to start with.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 15 Oct 2003 22:26:00 -0600, "Jim & Lil" <jim.morris-at-sk.sympatico.ca> wrote:

No. Gasoline deteriorates rather quickly and best used in a few weeks. You could add some stabilizer to store it, but for safety sake better not to store any at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.