Sheetrock question


I've got a weird situation where I need to hang sheetrock upside down, like on a ceiling. The board has to span 28 inches between supports. There is no way I can put any more support between the span. Is there any special sheetrock that is stronger than the regular stuff I can get at the borg? Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
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5/8 won't sag as much as 1/2 inch....
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wrote:

As noted, 5/8" should do it. My daughter's condo has 24" spacing between trusses and the 5/8" rock there shows no signs of sag.
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There is nothing "weird" about installing sheetrock on ceilings; that's typically how houses are finished. Installing sheetrock on a ceiling "upside down" would mean installing it such that the (typically) brown, unfinished side is exposed to the room.
benick made a sound recommendation to use 5/8" sheetrock. That's what I use for ceilings.
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If you really can't then 5/8 is your better choice.
But
Why can't you run furring strips across the 28" OC and run them every 16" OC so you can have a good ceiling out of 1/2"?
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Explain what you're doing, and you will get worthwhile input. Otherwise here's the standard answer: No, you can't unless you like wavy ceilings, like the ocean, but upside down.
R
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You're right Rico. Not enough info.
I am wrapping the main trunk in the basement. On each side of the trunk, I've got metal studs hanging down from a track. The bottom track is in the same plain as the bottom of the trunk. This was done to get the most headroom. The sides have got 1/2" sheetrock already installed. I really don't want to drill holes into the bottom of the trunk to tack the sheetrock, but I am thinking I might be forced to keep the sheetrock from sagging.
wrote:

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I don't think you will have many problems in this situation.
I would add a single 1" DW screw at the mid-point or use construction adhesive every 16-24".
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DON'T install screws into the sheet metal duct, you will have nothing but troubles as the sheet metal duct moves all the time as it heats up and/or cools down, and it won't stop sagging as the sheet metal will just sag by being pulled down by the weight of the drywall.
I have heard/read of some very strong "drywall" type materials, you may have to do some Google research and it is expensive and special order once you find a supplier.
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Jack wrote:

How about under the span? Can you spare an 1-1/2" headroom to run 2x4s at 16" o.c. perpendicular to the existing framing?

Both 5/8? type X and 1/2" high-strength ceiling panels are rated for 24" o.c. framing. Both should be available, and some claim the 1/2" has better sag resistance than 5/8". I'm not going to say go ahead and do it, though. I don't know enough about the situation.
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On Wed, 21 Oct 2009 21:53:03 -0400, Jack wrote:

5/8" board might do it, but I don't know that it is rated for more than a 24" span. There is also special ceiling board (used it once hanging professionally for about a year), but again, 24" span, not 28".
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A picture would help a lot...
Without really understanding your situation all that well, how about stiffening the sheetrock by screwing it to sections of firring strips that will be perpendicular to the joists and fit between them and any other obstacles (attached only to the sheetrock, before it goes up.)
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a while back this topic was discussed
28" is a bit far but 5/8 should be fine
cheers Bob
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I just did this exact same setup in my basement( pics to follow in another post soon). I have the supply and return running next to each other spanning about 4 feet. What I did was first put some liquid nails on the 1/2" sheetrock in the middle where the span was the greatest. The I put 2 or 3 screws at the edge of the return trunk ( It's just return air). It's solid now, no problems. Your situation is a little different. It sounds as if you have just the one supply trunk. You would have to drill right smack in the middle of the supply trunk, which I don't think its good. I agree with everyone else, 5/8" sheetrock would do the trick. It should span 28" with no problem. If it makes you feel better put some liquid nails or Loctite power grabber in the middle.
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