sheetrock over popcorn ceiling

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Hi all:
I've got some popcorn ceilings that I hate, but unfortunately I had them tested and they had a significant amount of asbestos on them. I don't really want to pay to have it professionally removed, so I'm searching for alternatives to removal at this point. The only choice I've found is to sheetrock over the popcorn. However, several of the rooms are extremely big (25x30), and I've been told by my contractor that I would not be happy with the results in such a big room, as the new sheet rock would appear "lumpy" due to the uneven surface it is being attached to.
Are the other alternatives? Is there a way to make sheetrocking work(put an additional frame over the popcorn before sheetrocking?) The ceiling is only 8' tall so I can't really do anything that would significantly lower it.
Thanks
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You could strap the ceiling again and put sheetrock on the new strapping, but do you really want to have asbestos trapped under there? Get rid of it now. It's pay now or pay later when you go to sell.
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Why? What problem will "trapped asbestos" cause?

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First off, there may not be any asbestos at all. If the house was built after 1977, it was not permitted. Next step, is why sheetrock over good sheetrock? Have you tried removing the stuff? It comes off easily with water and a sponge. Ed
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wrote:

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wrote:

Easily is relative. :)
But popcorn removal would be definitely easier than re-sheetrocking.
Jeff
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It is easy or I would not say it was. My wife did it all. Oh, maybe that's why I though it was easy. ;)
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"I've met with my contractor "
Well that was your first mistake, now you are stuck.
"It is easy or I would not say it was. My wife did it all. Oh, maybe that's why I though it was easy. ;)
Way to go.
Walt Conner
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You have a problem here. Covering up the asbestos, or removing it yourself could make the problem worse. You shouldn't take advice on this from someone who can't cite your state law on the matter.
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Correct, I found the original post and see there is asbestos. Yes, you can remove it yourself, but you do have to comply with the law regarding removal and disposal. Generally, it should be wet down to keep it from blowing around during removal, rooms must be sealed off during removal and special protective clothing should be worn, including respirators. Ed
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Well, let me first say that I appreciate everyone attempting to answer my questions. That being said, everybody in the thread has I believe completely missed the point of the question :)
The ceiling IS asbestos. It has been tested as such. I have no intention of removing it myself, for safety and legal reasons. In my state, it must be professionally removed. Professional removal is way too expensive for my purposes. The reason I want it removed is merely because I don't like the look of popcorn on the ceiling, not that I'm afraid for my safety or anything. And, well, updating the look simply isn't worth the price of safe removal.
So I am left with two options: (1) leave it as is (2) make the ceiling flat without removing the popcorn or in some way causing asbestos to seep into the air. My problem is that the only option for #2 that I have heard about is to simply sheetrock over the popcorn, which for this large a room presents a major problem as far as how it will look when its done. So my question is basically is there any other way to make the ceiling flat without removing the popcorn and without the simplistic "sheetrock over it". Is there something I can do to prep the ceiling short of asbestos removal that would help make sheetrocking over it look more even? Putting in spacers? I don't know, that's why I'm asking.
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Well, that takes me back to my last answer; get professional advice.
For instance, in NYS if you put up your new drywall, you would have to disclose that there is asbestos of unknown condition under the new ceiling. I doubt anyone would then buy your house at any price; in fact, I doubt you could even get a realtor to list it until you had it all professionally ripped out. Your law might be even stricter.
If you are not concerned about having asbestos on your ceiling, you should be.
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It is only a danger if the fibers are inhaled. It is perfectly legal to seal them with paint and other materials to render them harmless to occupants. The danger is in removing and creating dust, cutting into the ceiling, or other work that can create asbestos dust. If it sits in place for a million years, it will be of no harm to you. Ed
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I don't think you understand the circumstances which make asbestos a hazard.
Walt Conner

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altho it takes A LOT of sheetrock mud you can just mud over the popcorn, being careful to not disturb it. if you want to be sure that it is nice and tight, then you can paint it (ideally airless spray) first and when dry then mud over it. the paint will also keep the popcorn from sucking up the mud. NOW ONE OTHER caveat - if you have radiant heat in the ceiling - it is integral to the popcorn of the ceiling and too much moisture will bring the WHOLE thing down.
Claudia __________________________________ "Age is...wisdom, if one has lived one's life properly." --Miriam Makeba, singer
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On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 00:04:03 GMT, "Wade Lippman"

In Florida you can encapsulate the asbestos and leave it in place, but I doubt that's actually possible on a ceiling. The issue is future remodeling, and unless you can encapsulate both top and bottom, you'll have a liability.
Also, locally, the only houses with asbestos that sell are the ones that are being bulldozed fro new ones. Any other sale is always contingent on the seller removing the asbestos and providing proof of removal. Fortunately in our area, asbestos use was rare in residential construction.
Jeff
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wrote:

Wow, sounds like a pretty harsh neighborhood. In my area, I'm guessing that 90% of all houses have asbestos in the ceilings. And floors. And lead paint on the walls, all of which are disclosed when selling and none of which appear to impede the sales in any way. But you mentioned asbestos was rare in your neighborhood, which may explain people's inherent aversion to buying a house with it. In my neighborhood, they've got no choice.
It is legal in my state to encapsulate it. The problem I have is that the only way I've heard to encapsulate it is to sheetrock over it, which won't achieve the look I desire (according to the contractor). I'm looking for other ways to do so (that maybe the contractor is unfamiliar with, or at least ways to make sheetrocking work.
People in this group seem to be under the impression that I haven't gotten professional advice. I have. I've met with my contractor and asbestos removal firms. In order to have it legally removed, I must use an asbestos removal firm, who must set up a negative pressure situation in my house for a week while removing the asbestos. The cost is extremely high, and the inconvenience is pretty great (move out for a week, move out all furniture, etc.). I cannot, as some have suggested, simply wet it down and legally remove it. It is not legal to do so in my state. Considering the only reason I want it removed is that I don't like the "look" of popcorn, it simply isn't worth it to me to have it professionally removed. I'd rather just leave it as is than spend $5000 or more just to get my ceiling to look a little bit nicer.
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wrote:

can't you screw 1x2's to the existing studs, and resheetrock as if it were a new ceiling? you'd have to make sure the existing ceiling could hold the weight, but large rooms are made frequently enough that a new ceiling could be possible. it would of course, shorten the height.
regards, charlie cave creek, az
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Right. It is not legal to exceed 65 mph either.
You pose no risk to anyone but yourself in the removal process and the risk is minimal. I'd say that homeowners around the country have been taking it down themselves and either don't know or don't care that it contains asbestos. I never had mine tested, never even thought it would have asbestos, don't know if it did as the house was built in 1978. It has been down for at least 5 years and the first I heard of asbestos was here about a year ago.
Ignorance is bliss?
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On 22 Oct 2003 14:46:54 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Actor 123) wrote:

Likely due to age and climate. Locally, a 30 year old house is an antique, and the 1950's era that may have asbestos and lead paint are often being torn down for the lots. There's almost no asbestos in residential heating systems here, and asbestos siding is the most common form, and it's also rare. It's also easier to deal with.

Sheetrock is the standard, though locally you have to ensure there is no access from above either. That may be due to the fact that we have 99% single floor homes.

Then you're probably stuck with sheetrock. Or not changing it.
Jeff
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