Sheetrock joint compound - wrong for small holes?

Hi,
I patched a small hole (3"x3" and used that white mesh) with sheetrock joint compounded (big bucket with a green lid) and it's still wet after 2 days. Maybe it's due to the humid weather conditions, but could it be that I should use some other material for patching holes and that this is more for drywalling?
Thanks!
Aaron Fude.
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Usually one would cut out a 4x4 inch square of drywall, trace it on the wall over the 3x3 hole, cut that out (to match the patch), back it with a small furring strip, screw on the 4x4 patch, then tape/mud/sand the seam.
For a 3x3 hole with fiberglass mesh tape, you used the right stuff for the first coat (green bucket). It takes longer for the green to dry, and it will also shrink more than the blue bucket, but it is stronger and harder for a base coat. When it dries do the top coat(s) with the blue bucket mud and sand it. (you would not want the blue bucket mud for the base coat, its too light)
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Aaron Fude wrote:

Next time, use plaster of paris, or a lightweight setting-type joint compound. Make sure it's sandable, "Durabond" is not. I think the stuff I used last time was called something like "Easysand 20", and it's pretty cheap.
It'll be a powder that you have to mix with water.
Bob
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Aaron Fude wrote:

Drywall joint compound is meant joints and for _thin_ applications. Anything much over 1/8" would be a heavy application. If it is thicker than 1/2" I wouldn't be surprised if it took a couple of days to dry in high humidity conditions. And sadly, it will probably shrink badly and be very weak when you finish. How thick did you lay it on?
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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I laid it on about 1/8". Should I just wait and let it dry or redo the whole thing?
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Aaron Fude wrote:

If it was only 1/8" then it should dry pretty quickly even if the humidity is sky-high. No more than 8 hours in the worst conditions I've ever worked in (warm with very humid air and little air movement). If it doesn't seem dry after an overnight wait then there has to be something else going on.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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wrote:

You have the material. Thinner coats of compound is better. I never try to patch, fix and finish all at once! I come back tomorrow, because I get better every day, heh!
-- Oren
"My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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Others have given you good advice, but I'll add to it my own little bent. When I use joint compound I only apply it in very thin coats. Might take a few days to get a repair finished, but it blends excellently (well I think so anyway) in with the wall - no sanding. I don't use that mesh stuff for repairs either - I find it impossible to work with. Paper tape works perfectly well.
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