Sharkbite fittings...

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The geek at HD had SWMBO put together and take apart a joint using the little wrench thingus. She said it seemed a little flimsy. So he asked her to put it back together and pull it apart. She was convinced.
Steve
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I didnt care much for the tool, not saying it is bad but I have arthritis in my hands and need something a little easier to hang on to so I made my own oversized one cut from 1/8 inch aluminum. Mine has a slot for 1/2" on one end and 3/4" on the other. Also a piece of cake to use the end of a piece of pipe a template to DIY it. Mine is about 7 inches long and I dont tend to lose tools like this while I will quickly misplace the little doer they sell at HD. Would really like something designed more like an open end wrench. Hmmm that might work in a pinch.
Jimmie
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I'm hoping they are permanent - one is under 6 inches of concrete, and another above and behind furnace duct and finished basement wall and ceiling.
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Like you, I used them for the first time ever this year. I only used them in exposed locations and will admit my error if it turns out they don't work long term.
Colbyt
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On Apr 26, 7:15 am, "Stormin Mormon"

Those little shark teeth are stainless. Have you ever picked up one of their fittings and examined it? Technically there's a lot more brass in the things than there needs to be - they could have easily cut down on the amount of brass, and cut a much bigger cost savings corner. But they didn't.
Pex fittings such as Zurn makes don't have stainless teeth - the whole thing is plastic, and they've been used in Europe for decades. I understand you're an old dog and a new trick _is_ something to be wary of, but in this instance you're just being an old dog. ;)
R
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On Apr 27, 8:14 am, "Stormin Mormon"

Our Home Depot has a display where you can play with the SharkBites. Put them together, take them apart, PEX to Copper, etc.
When I bought the ones I used, I didn't bother spending the $3 (?) on the disassembly tool. All you really need is anything that will push the release ring evenly back into the fitting.
I don't recall what I used, but I took one apart at home just as a test and had no problem using some tool or object that was just laying around the shop.
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On Apr 27, 8:59 am, "Stormin Mormon"

I can actually see not buying one. It takes all of 5 minutes to make. I can imagine SBs used in some tight locations may be near impossible to disconnect without a specially fabricated tool.
Jimmie
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On Wed, 27 Apr 2011 07:19:42 -0700 (PDT), JIMMIE

IIRC I used an open end wrench - the thin "tappet" type
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The last one I put on was three years ago at my cabin. Haven't made it up there yet because of the snow, but so far so good. It was much easier than cutting out the burst pipe under the frame of a wood cabin, then torch welding a new piece in. I like them, although they may not be the best choice in every situation.
Steve
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I've used SharlBites twice and have no complaints so far.
One time I turned off the water, cut a pipe, capped it and turned the water back on before the commercial was over. I didn't miss a second of the football game and my wife, who was in the kitchen making dinner at the time, never even knew that I had turned the water off.
Another time I used a SharkBite Tee to tap into a copper pipe at the front of the house (which was at street pressure) then ran a length of PEX across the basement ceiling and used a SharkBite straight connector to connect the PEX to the copper pipe at the backyard hose spigot. Less than an hour's work to get street pressure to the backyard hose.
Both of these connections were made in the tight quarters near the basement ceiling above storage cabinets - not a location where I would have wanted to sweat copper.
One of the many advantages of the SharkBites is their ability to swivel even after installation. With copper, you need to "aim" each fitting to get the pipe to run in the direction you need. With SharkBites, you just pop them on and swivel them in any direction you want.
Costly yes, but damn convenient. In my case, I feel the cost was justified based solely on the fact that I didn't have to sweat fittings in locations where access was severely limited.
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wrote:

I've used SharlBites twice and have no complaints so far.
One time I turned off the water, cut a pipe, capped it and turned the water back on before the commercial was over. I didn't miss a second of the football game and my wife, who was in the kitchen making dinner at the time, never even knew that I had turned the water off.
Another time I used a SharkBite Tee to tap into a copper pipe at the front of the house (which was at street pressure) then ran a length of PEX across the basement ceiling and used a SharkBite straight connector to connect the PEX to the copper pipe at the backyard hose spigot. Less than an hour's work to get street pressure to the backyard hose.
Both of these connections were made in the tight quarters near the basement ceiling above storage cabinets - not a location where I would have wanted to sweat copper.
One of the many advantages of the SharkBites is their ability to swivel even after installation. With copper, you need to "aim" each fitting to get the pipe to run in the direction you need. With SharkBites, you just pop them on and swivel them in any direction you want.
Costly yes, but damn convenient. In my case, I feel the cost was justified based solely on the fact that I didn't have to sweat fittings in locations where access was severely limited.
reply:
what he said ................
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2011 17:43:32 -0700, "Steve B"

Same situation for me. Putting in a bathroom in daughter's basement, I needed to get the water to the toilet - I had the concrete cut out for the drain but didn't want to remove any more concrete than necessary, so I drilled the concrete and put a plastic pipe in as a "sleave" and the copper pipe inside that -kinda hard to solder down under the concrete, but the shark-bite worked beautifully. - packed with sand after. Then I needed to bring water down the end wall for the basin - but the furnace duct was 2 inches from the wall, and against the joists - and was to be boxed in with drywall. Virtually impossible to get to with torch to solder it, so again a shark-bite was used.
At $8+ each, vs $0.37 for a solder LB, I thought long and hard about it (I'm a cheap guy) - but there will be no question if I ever get into that kind of situation again.
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wrote:

This stuff is like Velcro, Super Glue, and other things that we didn't have in our childhood, but are common now. Now that they are common as leaves, we wonder how we ever lived without them, and recall all the repair nightmares that would have gone a lot better with such simple fixits. I'll still sweat pipes during new construction, and in places that are not tight or fire sensitive. But for a slam dunk git'r'done and go watch the game, or rescue SWMBO from an emergency water situation, they are the best. For all the time and risk saved, they are well worth the extra bucks, IMHO.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? www.cabgbypasssurgery.com Heart Surgery Survival Guide
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...what he said, especially about the use of sweat fittings whenever possible.
When I did my "tap into the street pressure pipe" project, the run from the PEX at the ceiling down to the pipe which ran through the wall to the hose spigot involved a number of twists and turns to keep it neat along the block wall.
I sweating up a zig-zagged section with about 6 fittings on the workbench, attached it to the wall, and then used a single SharkBite up near the ceiling to tie it into the PEX.
Using SharkBites for the entire project would have been rather expensive, using all PEX would have looked out of place along the back wall, so I mixed and matched and ended up with a cost-effective outcome that looks good.
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Thats the way I did a manifold in a house I flipped. Worked well. Looks good too especially if you polish it up. One of the things the buyer mentioned.
Jimmie
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Steve B wrote the following:

...and you didn't burn the house down.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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