Sharkbite fittings...

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Had to do an emergency repair of an elbow last week that leads to my hot kitchen sink anhot d dishwasher. Since I'm a new homeowner I didn't have a propane torch or spare copper pipe parts or solder (never soldered pipe before) so I invested in a $6 sharkbite elbow instead. snapped on easy, no leaks, handles the pressure and the quick on and off that the faucet and dishwasher demand.
The elbow is under the floor joist, for hot water, in an unfinished basement. Easy to check up on and easy to re-repair. Curious to people's opinions on whether this type of repair is considered permanent or not.
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Product is selling well, no negatives that I am aware of in this NG. Only quibbles are the price, but the convenience is hard to beat. Definitely on my list for future emergencies or impossible situations.
Joe
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It is expensive compared to a regular fitting, but for those that cannot solder, $6 is most likely cheaper than a $1 elbow installed by a plumber. If the plumber only charged $4 to make a house call, that would be a better way to go.
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wrote

I think the safety and convenience factor of replacing them in tight spots is worth the few extra bucks. It sure was for the one I replaced that was under a cabin. It was far less labor intensive than I thought it would be. In stud walls and places where there is a fire hazard, like under a cabin, there's no comparison.
Steve
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They're also great in the repair fittings box since you can use them with copper, PVC, and PEX. Very versatile. Another nifty use is for temp runs, like when you're trying to get the water back on at the end of the day and you know you're going to have to undo some stuff the next day. Makes it trivial.
R
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wrote:

I had a rental house with copper pipes but someone had installed some PEX pipe for the bathtub. They used these sharkbite fittings one all the PEX. Some of them were inside the bathroom wall. The elbow up at the shower head pipe, where it comes out of the wall was one of them. Apparently the moving of the shower head caused it to come loose, and I could see the sleeve which is compressed to install the pipe was hitting a 2x4 which the pipe was strapped to. I found that whenever someone took a shower there was water coming out of the wall and into the basement. I had to rip out the wall to find the problem.
I suspect because this pipe was not under constant pressure, plus the movement of that shower head when people adjust it, not to mention the prior owners or tenants may have used that pipe to hang a soap & shampoo rack (whatever those things are called), but the pipe was not in the fitting, and it was a major leak inside the wall, which ruined the wallboard, and caused mold and even some rotting of the floor.
From this, I personally would not use them as a permanent repair. They're great for a quickie fix, but I just dont trust them. If this was on a pipe where there was always pressure, it could have been a real mess.
Soldering copper pipe (sweating) is not all that difficult. Get yourself a DIY home repair book, or search the web for sweating copper pipe.
I replaced that pipe with copper, I intended to replace all of them and get rid of all that PEX, but I sold the house. (Not because of the pipes, because of asshole tenants).
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On Apr 25, 6:24am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

PEX expands and contracts with changes in water temperature a lot more than copper. I installed an eight or nine foot run of PEX going to a washing machine that runs along above the machines and countertop and was installed in a straight line mounted to a board. The hot water line expands ~3/8" when the machine fills with hot water.
If allowance isn't made for that movement then it's reasonable to expect problems. Anytime someone installs something and doesn't allow for its normal movement it's reasonable to expect problems.
R
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On Mon, 25 Apr 2011 06:53:32 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

While PEX seems to be the new fad, I personally would not use it in my home, and particularly not with sharkbite fittings. They clain PEX will last many years, but like all plastics, it will degrade with time and fail. 10 or 20 years from now, they will probably ban the stuff after many failures due to age. Besides that. I feel that plumbing should be SOLID PIPE, not a hose, which is what PEX is. Maybe I'm old fashioned, but I'll stick with rigid pipe. Copper is preferred, but even galvanized steel has always been reliable, and is sturdy. Solid pipe looks better too. PEX and any other plastic pipes like CPVC sag and look cheap. However I have found CPVC to be pretty reliable as long as enough hangers are used to keep it from sagging.
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On Apr 26, 2:52am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

I feel all roofs should be slate or tile.

Looks better? Huh? You're choosing what is a purely functional item based on aesthetics? The only place you see exposed PEX is in a basement, and if there's exposed PEX in a basement there's probably a lot of other things that offend your refined sensibilities.
R
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2011 08:18:07 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

What did you do, lose the topic? This is about PLUMBING, not roofs....

If you had read what I wrote, which had nothing to do with roofs, I said that plastic pipe is not durable and I would not use it for that reason. I followed up with the aesthetics, which are not nearly as important.
LEARN HOW TO READ ....
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On Apr 26, 6:31pm, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

You wrote, "I feel that plumbing should be SOLID PIPE..." I wrote, "I feel all roofs should be slate or tile."
I will walk you though it. SOLID PIPE is a stupid term, because pipe is hollow. SOLID PIPE is a stupid term as all pipe is solid - that is, there is no such thing as lattice-work plumbing pipe. SOLID PIPE is stupid because typing in all caps is for nimrods. Solid pipe...assuming you mean something like copper or galvanized, is expensive to install and quite durable - just like a slate roof.
Your feelings are ever so important to me, but when it comes right down to it I, like most people, will be making my decision based on a risk vs. reward analysis. Sad to say your feelings don't enter into it but dollars do. Sorry.

Learn to think. Thank you for finally seeing that the aesthetics have nothing at all to do with choosing plumbing pipe material.
How durable is copper when the pipes freeze? PEX expands and when it thaws out, the PEX will shrink back down to its original size without damage. There are tradeoffs in everything. Yours is trading off logic so you can hang on to your opinion.
It's highly entertaining that you believe CPVC (plastic) to be "pretty reliable" but another plastic, which you have obviously never used or even read up on, you believe to be crap. Willful ignorance is a pretty much bulletproof armor, eh?
R
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2011 07:21:16 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

That's why man invented the GUN !!!!!!
And how the hell can someone sleep while someone is hacking away the pipes in the cellar? That's retarded.

Jesus HATES you (and everyone else).
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I bet I could get every exposed copper pipe out of your house while you are awake in the next room. Tubing cutter is virtually silent.
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wrote

JW is a SNERT. (Snot Nosed Egotistical Rude Teen) Don't pay him any attention.
He poses spew, and seriously doubt he's ever done any home repairs. His vocabulary is adolescent, and his responses do not address any context being discussed.
HTH
Steve
Heart surgery pending? www.cabgbypasssurgery.com Heart Surgery Survival Guide
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2011 22:56:50 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"

I'm waiting..... I'm still waiting..... Well, where the hell are you coming????
You did want a bath, right? I cranked up the water pressure just for you..... :)
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2011 07:21:16 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

ALL as soon as possible
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2011 20:19:53 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That make no sense unless you know the pipes need replacing, or galvanized commonly fails in your area due to water chemistry. Scaling up and corrosion depends on the water where you live. Same with copper pinholing and corrosion. I don't want to beat a dead horse, but here near Chicago where we use Lake Michigan water, galvanized works well. My last house has 90 year old galvanized in the wall vertical runs and never leaked. Do you have a 90 year old copper or PEX example? I replaced the basement horizonal runs due to reduced hot water flow. That pipe was 60 years old, and the mineral scale clogging was mostly around the water heater joints. There was no serious corrosion, and nothing ever leaked. My current house has 50 year old galvanized, and no leaks. It seems the hot water flow is a bit low. I could just replace the fittings and short runs around the water heater to fix that, but if it wouldn't be much more work to replace it all from the service entrance up to the verticals. If the verticals look bad I would just open the 2 plumbing walls and replace them too. The more I read of copper pinholing, the less suitable it seems. Despite what I read here, wider reading has led me to the conclusion not to replace with copper when I do it, but to use new galvanized. If PEX meets code here, I'd use it before copper. But I can't see a reason to use PEX instead of galvanized here. I don't know why copper even got started here. Plumber chic? Anyway, pipe selection is like real estate. Location, location, location.
--Vic
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I just installed a couple of elbows and straight connectors with PEX for a newly positioned sillcock (outdoor faucet). The old faucet was mounted on the side of the house with the driveway. That was a stupid idea which was proven when the wife hit it driving out and broke the copper pipe. I cut the copper pipe down to the shut off valve and connected the PEX with the elbow Sharkbite, rerouting the PEX to the front of the house above the drop ceiling in the basement. Being it's only cold water, the expansion, if any, will be minimal. So far, it's doing well and if any leaks prevail, I'll see wet spots on a ceiling tile.
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install. I put both a piece of copper and PEX into the end of the Sharkbites and tried to pull. Not to brag, but I'm no weakling and I couldn't pull these suckers out without the tool to remove them. I know it's not under water pressure, but it made me have confidence they won't simply slide out easily.
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I remember reading somewhere that the Sharkbite fittings can take something like 1000 pounds in tension. If you could pull one out, I would have started this reply with 'Sir.' ;)
R
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