Seventeen Pounds

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That's how much the opossum oweighed! Caught him Monday night.
Meanwhile, my son had a small emergency: A young outdoor cat suffered a "glove" wound, seemingly at the hands (so to speak) of two pre-dead rotweillers.
A "glove" wound is where the skin/fur is sheared from the animal's tail - like removing a glove.
Anyway, son gets an appointment with vet to have the tail repaired (actually removed) and I used this as a teaching moment. He, I, the injured cat, and the osurly opossum go to the vet's.
Only one of the six employees of the clinic had ever been this oclose to a opossum.
Lots of ooh'ing and ahh'ing. The opossum ohissed at the technicians - they ogiggled! The opossum opened wide his omouth - the employees remarked on the many sharp oteeth! The three veterinarians on duty were more sanguine - "I've known opossums," one said, "nasty ocreatures."
My son and his discouraged cat go home. The opossum and I go back to our garage where I give the opossum a bowl of dry cat food. An hour later, the food is gone, so Mr. Opossum and I take a little trip to a large field not far away.
Last seen, the opossum was owaddling off into the night looking for more cat food to ofilch.
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Good eatin'
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wrote:

Good eatin'
********************************888
That's 0'eatin' to you.
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On Wed, 31 Dec 2008 16:49:47 -0800 (PST), in2dadark

Oh, please...... My hangover is bad enough, and now you just made my stomach turn. Bleeeccchhhhhhhh !!!!!!!!
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wrote:

... should be brought inside if you really like him. One man's "pet" quickly becomes some else's "pest". I say the same about dogs that are allowed to run wild too ... in case you think I am just a cat hater.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In general I agree.
The cats that live outside at my place are much like songbirds that live outside. I put out a little food because I enjoy watching them lounge around and do cat-things. They are not lap-cats nor even very catchable unless they are sick, so no one could define them as "pets."
The "inside" cats are a different matter. The "inside" cats don't go outside and the "outside" cats don't come in.
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HeyBub wrote:

Like Margaret Thatcher said about warships in a harbor- sure, they are safe, but that isn't what warships are for. Yes, 'indoor only' animals live longer, but so what? An indoor-only cat isn't a cat anymore, it is a self-propelled plush toy. If an indoor cat tries to slip out through open doors or windows, I'd say that is a pretty clear statement about how it feels about things. A gilded cage is still a cage.
I don't keep house pets. Aside from my allergies, it wouldn't be fair to them. I'm gone around ten hours a day most days, and asleep another 7 or 8. And if anything is gonna jump in my lap or rub my ankles the other six hours, it better be able to talk. I make do with watching the birds and squirrels and turkeys and deer and raccoons and such in the back yard. And if my bird feeder also feeds the occasional cat or raptor, well, I didn't make the rules of the game. I don't know what hard science the bird lovers have to offer, but I would wager the increase in predation from housecats (and their feral offspring and escapees) helps offset the reduced die-off and increased population from all the backyard feeders. They can't have it both ways- if adding predators isn't allowed, feeding stations should also be banned as interfering with nature. (Note that many condo communities with ponds, and public parks with water, already ban duck feeding, just to reduce the amount of crap they have to clean up. Ducks are lazy- a reliable source of food, and they will hang around big-time, sometimes all winter in areas that are well north of where you would expect to find them.)
-- aem sends...
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Agreed but if some other exotic like the afore mentioned Rottweiller, decides a feral cat is a chew toy you should allow nature to take it's course.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Unless a dog blunders into a den of kittens when the mother isn't around, or a pack of dogs gangs up on a cat caught away from a tree to climb, the odds are the cat will do just fine. Most dogs, once their nose has been clawed once, learn real fast not to attack cats.
-- aem sends...
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That probably works for little dogs. You have never seen a dog pick up a cat and shake it until the neck breaks I guess.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

No, but I have seen a ten-pound tomcat embarrass big dogs on numerous occasions. Unless the Big Dog utterly blindsides them, most adult cats have the agility and speed to quickly land a telling blow. And of course, if the dog and cat in question share the same roof, the cat usually establishes the pecking order early on. (Hey dog? I know where you sleep, dog. Be nice to me, or wake up with a shredded nose....)
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aemeijers wrote:

Agreed. Further, cats DO have some defensive capabilities. A cat, for short distances, can hit 30 mph. Cats can also climb to avoid a fight.
Still, there are some dogs who are impervious to pain, devious to a fault, and belive their mission in life is to kill or maim any living thing they can find (i.e., pit bulls) that's not a member of their pack. Dogs are pack animals and genetically programmed to attack (the pack has the best chance of survival if all its members attack the prey).
This latter attribute is why hungry alligators in Florida need only come up out of the drainage ditch near a retirement condo to get a free meal. Presently some lap dog will get in the 'gator's face, barking ferociously!
Down the hatch!
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And to that I present Cheerio (who has since passed).
    http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic#tpocj&s=5
That dog is like 150 lbs mind you. He took no shit from anyone or thing. Again, extremely prople oriented including kids. When daughter was young they would take him roller blading in arms. He stayed with them willingly.

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When I was a kid my mother had an orange tom named lucky. He was hell on wheels concerning dogs. I'll never forget the big dog that strayed into our yard being pounced on by the cat. On his rapid retreat the sissy decided to take a shortcut through dad's veggie garden, not realizing the far side had a chicken-wire border. I couldn't see the old mutt through the tomatoes, but could hear him howling when he hit the wire. He thought the cat had caught him.
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aemeijers wrote:

Allergies are a poor excuse: you can get shots.
How much ever you sleep, I guarantee the cat will sleep more. Having a cat as a house partner a symbiotic relationship; in return for food, water, and a litter box, the cat will (usually) keep your house free of pests like mice and roaches.
Further, countless studies show that people who have an indoor cat or dog have fewer health problems, live longer, and have a rosier outlook on life. Moreover, the chicks really dig a guy who has a cat.
Cats can save you money, too. A couple of kittens and a big box of packing peanuts (a kitty swimming pool) is good for hours and hours of entertainment (for both of you).
And don't worry that you're interfering with the balance of nature. A feral cat has a life-expectancy of three to four years. An indoor cat can easily live into a third decade.
One more insistent observation: de-clawing. The downside of declawing a cat is that you rob the cat of its primary weapon of offense and its primary method of defense (it can't climb). The reason people de-claw their cats is to protect their furniture. But the furniture is only furniture whereas the cat is a member of the family.
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My personal longest living cat was a few months shy of 25 yrs when it passed.

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Red Green wrote:

Into the its third decade. Right.
Towser, the mouser-in-chief at the Glennturrent distillery lived to be 23. And she was catching mice up to the very end. All told, she caught 28,989 mice during her tenure and earned a place in the Guinness Book of Records.
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The indoor/outdoor ones I have usually avg about 15yrs. Not sure how long one of my two I/O's will fare. He's always been FIV positive. Couldn't tell by looking at him. One of the most of the most happy-go-lucky people oriented critters I've had. Just have to get him to the vet even with minor stuff since he has a weaker immune system.

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Red Green wrote:

Yeah, I've got one named Boris who is likewise happy-go-lucky. Absolutely wacky. Loves everybody, sleeps on a sloping roof on his back, all four paws pointing to the moon, pretends he's stuck in a tree and yowls pitifully (although only six feet from the ground), all sorts of crazy-cat antics.
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On Fri 02 Jan 2009 07:21:57p, HeyBub told us...

Our five are all indoor cats, mainly due to the large dogs and coyotes roaming the neighborhood. We do take them outdoors with us into the backyard, but only when we can spend time with them. With five, they certainly entertain both themselves, each other, and us. Our eldest is now 17; our yougest is 4. They're in extremely good health.
We're gone a lot from home during the day, and though it's obvious they miss us, I don't think they're the least bit lonely.
--
Wayne Boatwright
(correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)
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