Setting up wireless home network

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I am setting up home network with four PCs. One is in the office and is connected to an 802.11n wireless router via a network cable. Two others have 802.11n wireless cards. Unfortunately one PC is in opposite side of the house floor above from the router and the signal is very weak. I am not sure it is due to the card or it is just because there so many walls between the card and the router the signal is very weak and transfer rate is very low.
What's the possible solution to this problem? I am thinking about running a network cable from the router to the room where the PC is.
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My home net is wired and I prefer it that way so I am not the most informed person on the subject.
You can get a "repeater" type of thing to echo the signal along. Also some routers and cards send and receive better than others.
Here is an Ebay link to show you what is out there: http://shop.ebay.com/items/__wireless-booster_W0QQ_nkwZwirelessQ20boosterQ20QQ_cqrZtrueQQ_nkwuscZwirelessQQ_nkwuscZboster?_rdc=1
Pulling a wire will cost less than most of the other options.
Colbyt
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On Sun, 5 Apr 2009 07:53:19 -0700 (PDT), against all advice,

If your access point has exposed antennas, try setting one of them in a vertical position, and one horizontal.
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wrote:

I think you'd do better at alt.internet.wireless - but FWIW my cure for a weak signal was a Linksys WRT54GL. On my second floor, and works fine through 2 interior walls, an aluminum sided exterior wall- and 50feet out to the deck. This is with the same computer that had sporadic connections through one interior wall.
Check Newegg and Amazon for prices and reviews- I had to check Newegg- still popular & $55.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

penalities.
Lou
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Of all the network systems I have set up, I always prefer a wired connection to a wireless. The only time to use a wireless connection is if the system is mobile or very temporary. That being said, if you want to troubleshoot the system; 1.) The first step is to swap-out the cards and see if you get the same performance. See if the system that is closer now has a week signal and the far one has a better signal ? 2.) Try to determine if there any objects in the way that would weaken the signal ? A. Is the far system in or above the garage that is insulated with foil faced insulation ? 3.) If possible, make the far system mobile and slowly move it closer and closer in proximity to the router. If you have something inhibiting the signal in the house, you will see the signal strength get noticeably better as soon as you move away from it or if its between you and the router, then as soon as you pass it up.
Just a place to start.
Sid.
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There are always numerous ways to address things like this. A simple solution if you can run a Cat5 network cable to the weak area, is to just purchase a wireless access point (WAP), plug it into the router and give it the same SSID. It'll transmit just like the antenna in the router, but from the weak location. If you want to hard wire any network stuff from the second location, connect the router to a switch, then to a WAP. Now you'll have both wired and wireless from the second location. You can also do this with a second wireless router, which tend to be cheaper than access points. You'd set it up as an access point and disable DHCP so it doesn't try to assign ip addresses
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Why is this complicated? My wireless router is connected to cable modem and has four network cable ports. One is used to connect the PC in the same room to the router as the router and cable modem are in that room. Why can't I just run network cable from the room with cable modem/router to the room with weak wireles connection and have the PC there be connected to the router via that network cable?
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Why is this complicated? My wireless router is connected to cable modem and has four network cable ports. One is used to connect the PC in the same room to the router as the router and cable modem are in that room. Why can't I just run network cable from the room with cable modem/router to the room with weak wireles connection and have the PC there be connected to the router via that network cable?
You absolutely can do that.
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Cat 5 cable is at least twice as fast for me using my wireless network card.
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.
sounds about right, most ethernet is 100 Mbps and wireless is 54Mbps
nate
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My MIMO card & Super G Wireless is 108
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We have three computers. The cable modem is connected to a wireless 802.11 g router which is connected to the computer. We have two other computers that have USB wireless adaptors.... one (across the hall) is a "g" and is pretty fast. The one at the opposite end of the house is an old "b" and also a USB wireless adaptor. I sometimes have to play with it to get it to pick up the signal but usually re- seating the USB connection or setting it up on top of the tower will solve the problem. When my brother in law came to visit with his laptop, he "looked" around for a signal and found two...my Belkin "unsecured" network and my next door neighbor's "unsecured" LinkSys network. I think you are going to a lot of trouble - installing new cables for yours. I believe it will pick up the signal just fine if you play with the adaptor a little.
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Yes that is by all means the easiest solution if running the wire isn't an issue. My linksys router is 2nd floor front of house while we use our laptops most often in the rear family rooms and kitchen area. Signal isn't extremely strong but works fine for most normal things and I have very little problem with larger downloads or uploads. Another option would be to locate the router in a more central location and run your cable back to the hardwired PCs.
Another group that is good for this is microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless

Why is this complicated? My wireless router is connected to cable modem and has four network cable ports. One is used to connect the PC in the same room to the router as the router and cable modem are in that room. Why can't I just run network cable from the room with cable modem/router to the room with weak wireles connection and have the PC there be connected to the router via that network cable?
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If routing the cable is doable, that is the very best solution possible. I think everyone was sensing that you preferred not going through that. Are you going to conceal it in the walls or just do the old AT&T method of stapling along the baseboards and up a corner of the room?
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Or just screw a little 4 port switch to the wall in the nearest wired room and connect the cat5 coming from your main house switch (or router) to the little local 4 port. Then run a cat5 from one of those 4 ports to the nearest weak room. And you will have 3 extra ports available locally to hook up a peer-to-peer networked printer, NAS or whatever else to boot!
My house is all hardwired but I only have one cat5 jack in each room, if need more than one wired port in a room I just get a 4 port switch and screw it to the wall next to the one jack. All the rooms are fed from a 16 port gigabit switch in the basement. That switch gets its IP addresses from my wireless router (connected to Comcast). I only use the wireless for laptops, everything else is on the wired LAN.
Bottom line is you dont need to home run another dedicated wire from the main router, just from the nearest wire available by splitting it with a local 4 port switch.
A 4 port switch costs about $20 more than a 4 port hub but will perform better and I think its worth it.
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..
Oops, sorry I didn't realize you only had one wired device right next to the router and no other wired ports in the house. In that case I'd pull a wires to all the desktops then use the wireless LAN for things that truly need to be portable like laptops.
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ls02 wrote:

I have a Linksys wireless router with high gain replacement antennas and I have external high gain omni and directional antennas that will hook to the wireless cards for desktops. I used this setup at a time when a neighbor had DSL and let me install the wireless router at his place. I got a really good signal through several walls and across into my home through a few more walls. If your router can accept high gain antennas, this could solve your problem.
TDD
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ls02 wrote:

That will work, of course, but before you get out the drill, I'd try moving your access point a couple feet higher, and reorienting it. If it has the little swivel antennas, try moving them around as well. Small changes can make a big difference. Are these PCs laptops or desktops? I'd try a different PC in the problem room, and see what kind of handshake it gets. Depending on what type of PC and card, they also sell external antennas to snatch more signal out of the air.
-- aem sends...
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Swap cards and see if the problem moves.
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