Service entrance through gutters

I am replacing the service entrance on my house, and the electric company says it need to be above my roof. The problem is that the house does not have overhanging eves (the roof ends right at the outside wall, and there is a gutter there).
How can I get the pipe for the service entrance through the gutter. The way I see it, I can do one of 3 things. 1) either have the pipe bent, or shim out the meter and pipe about 4 inch from the wall. 2) bend the pipe so it goes inside the wall 3) cut the gutter, lift it so it drains away from the pipe, and put in flashing (but there will still be a gap in the gutter.
None of these sound like great ideas. Does anyone have any better ideas or can you tell me if it is possible to havea 2 in steel pipe bent to go out 4 more inched; and if there are brackets that will hold the pipe 6-8 inches away from the wall.
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use a recessed box instead of a surface mount and the SE conduit will be in the wall entirely. Easier said than done since that conduit is 2" and the header in the wall is probably a 2x4. This dosen't leave much wood for the cap on the wall but you don't need all that much in a finished wall. Maybe you can reinforce the cut beam with metal strapping.
You might also look for a box you can mount above the meter with holes such that you can offset the SE conduit. Basically a bigass J box.
Build an overhang and move the gutter out. Not practical either but possible and may result in the best cosmetic solution
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is it possible to flip it around the corner to the gable end?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is it a hip roof? How about moving it to the end of the wall?
Last question: Ask them what to do in this "exceptional" case?
They will usually work with you if there is no other solution.
--
Colbyt
One picture can be worth a 1000 words.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bite the $bullet and BURY the service.
--
:)
JR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 11 Jul 2008 25:78:98 -0500, Jim Redelfs

Or put a pole in the yard for the meter, put a main disconnect under the meter, and run an underground feed into the house. This is common on farms where there are several buildings being fed off the main. Once past the meter, you can pretty much do whatever you want with the wireing as long as it still meets code.
I have seen houses that have a 4x4 post sticking out of the roof right behind the gutter. That works, but then you got to do all kinds of flashing.
The gable end idea is probably the best solution, or else get a pole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well you could remove about 4" of gutter and cap each end providing each run has a downspout, then you would use some cedar shingles to make a ridge under the roofingto direct the water left and right into the remaining gutters. Still I think this is an inelegant solution. Ed wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12 Jul 2006 06:46:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com wrote:

If the conduit for the service entrance is above the roof, what do they attach the strain-relief/carrier and drip-loop to? In any case, you should be able to either buy pre-bent sections of heavy conduit, or have the pipe bent.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Any muffler shop can bend to your needs Goedjn wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.