Serious Question - Why am I splitting firewood

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote the following:

Like others have said, it reduces drying time because there is more surface area to eliminate moisture, especially if the bark is left on. Besides, if you are complaining about the effort, it's probably the only heavy exercise that you get.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Wed, 18 May 2011 12:37:43 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I never used to split except to make it fit into the door of my stove. [about 12"]
Unsplit wood takes longer to season, but, IMO, stays drier if uncovered. A 12" diameter log makes a good 'all nighter' in the stoves I used to have. New airtights might choke on them.

When I got tired of moving wood around I bought a ventless propane stove. One of the smarter moves I've made in life. Current propane prices make it a bit higher than firewood-- but the control and convenience make up for it-- and the stove has been paid for 20times over when propane was cheaper for a few years.
Jim
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On 5/18/2011 11:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Four quarters will give you more heat more efficiently than the whole log.
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Steve Barker
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On May 18, 9:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

A reason not mentioned: After splitting you have a bigger pile than before :). A rick of wood in the rounds will grow about 10% after splitting.
Harry K
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On Wed, 18 May 2011 12:37:43 -0400, roybaldone wrote:

Dries quicker, easier to stack, burns better.

Can't help you there. Gotta friend who is 54 that heats his whole small house in the country with split firewood. He has a log splitter though and can fly through a cord of wood in a an hour. He'll buy 2 3rds his winter's supply cut to length then split it. That's 3 cords. The rest he cuts down trees and drags them back with his tractor and does the whole deal himself. He probably spends less than 300 bucks a year to heat his house. He's got propane for hot water and to backup his wood burner.
Maybe you should invest in a hydraulic splitter?
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Faster drying, easier handling, and sometimes you need smaller pieces to get a fire going.
Loading a woodstove takes a bit of practice too. First of all, you need two or more logs. One piece of wood does not burn very well, but two logs feed off of each other for a better, hotter, fire. Just watch two logs side by side and see the flames licking back and forth.
It is nearly impossible to light a large log. Building a fire, you need very small wood, then a bit larger, still larger, then the big logs. When the fire is down, you put smaller split pieces in to get it going and to start the larger pieces that will give a longer burn time.
I always had a variety of sizes on hand to load up the stove. The problem recently is cost. If you can get free wood, great. Buying cordwood cut and split is getting too expensive and not worth the effort compared to turning a thermostat. Good to have some on hand in case of power outages though.
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On May 18, 11:37 am, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I'm a month shy of 75 years old and I enjoy the exercise of splitting firewood. I have to do some splitting because the rounds are 2ft in diameter and just too heavy and big to fit in the fireplace without splitting them. I have free wood and so I can really save some $$ by heating our house with free wood. Our heatolator fireplace can keep the house at 70 unless it is very windy out and/or below 20F. I just turn on the furnace fan to run continuously. I do realize I am paying something extra to run the blower continuously, but it would be on quite a lot if I was using the furnace to heat the house, so the delta is pretty small compared to using natural gas.
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wrote:

Ditto. I'm 70 and enjoy the exercise of splitting my own wood with a sledge & wedge. I keep 5 years worth of split firewood under cover just in case I get 'old'. I burn the oldest first, never have to worry if it's dry enough to burn, & refill the shed every spring. Easy to do when it's off your own land. Red
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Same here. 76 heat almost 100% with wood. I have a TroyBilt splitter but it only gets used ont he knotty/tough stuff. Got around 40 cords of Black Locust cut/split/stacked and still cutting B Locust whenever I can. That stuff doesn't rot. This year I am burning stuff I cut back in either 93 or 96 (can't recall which) and even the stuff in direct contact with the ground has only a bit of surface detioration on the 'dirt' side.
Current project is 7 big B Locust to be removed from a Farmers farmstead. That should take me a couple months at the speed I work any more.
Harry K
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