Septic tank cover

I just had my septic tank pumped and when they took the lid off it cracked in three pieces. They put two of the pieces back on and told me I would have to take care of it. The lid is 23" square on top and tapered. I can not find one and have two choices. Either make a form and pour a new one, or make a cover out of wolmanized wood larger than the the hold and wrap it in 6 mill poly. Just wondering what the opinions are of making one out of wood and setting it on top. I would make it out of tong & grove 2 x 6 treated wood and wrap it in plastic. Will this work and be OK?
Thanks,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 14 Feb 2009 15:50:52 -0800 (PST),

It would probably do the job...but part of the reason they make them out of concrete is so they are heavy enough that kids can't move them.
IIWM, I'd make a simple form and cast a new one. Put in a couple pieces of rebar so it doesn't suffer the same fate as the first one.
HTH,
Paul F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It will be covered with 20" of dirt, so I won't need to worry about anyone moving it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com wrote:

in that case, go have your local weld shop cut you out a piece of 1/2" plate and weld a handle on it and be done.
s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And put a ring or eyebolt in it while the concrete is still wet, to make it easier to pull up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com wrote:

http://www.septicsolutions.net/store/risers_lids.htm Look near the bottom of the page for square to round adapters.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Feb 14, 5:50pm, "JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com"

Here is what I did in a similar situation: I made min in position on the tank. cut a piece of 3/4 plywood the the size / shape of the tank, used the dirt smoothed for the form, made a rebar frame so it would be 2 times as strong as necessary & left loops to protrude to lift it by, set a round washtub in the middle with a T handle of rebar sticking up. I poured the lid, & also filled the washtub. The result was just professional, The wash tub was pulled out to leave a clean looking cleanout hole, the contents made the perfect plug. I had it pumped a couple of years later, they just took a bar and broke out the plywood under the cleanout hole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Feb 14, 6:50pm, "JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com"

I'd call around, maybe to septic people, and find where to buy one. The people that pumped your septic should have helped you in either getting a new cover or fixing the old. I would not use them again. I did some work on repairing a box past my septic tank where the second field was switched and there was a local concrete caster that made tanks and all concrete stuff connected with it. Also, many years ago, when septic was first pumped, I had a concrete ring and cap put in for easy access rather than have to dig it up each time. It's in an area not visible when you pass the house but if need be there are ways to disguise.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com wrote:

Usually the tanks are locally made because of their weight. I would bet you could get a replacement if you called the couple places in your area that make tanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That would be my suggestion also. Start with the guy closest to you and work out. Look under "concrete products" in the Yellow Pages.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Perry525 had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Septic-tank-cover-359510-.htm :
Perry ------------------------------------- JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gma wrote:

When thinking about a new lid, give consideration to, checking how full the tank is and when it will next require emptying and how easy it is to find and move. Being able to check the height of the solids within the tank and therefore if it needs emptying this year or in ten years time is always handy and it saves money and trouble. (You only pay to empty it -when it really needs to be emptied and before it backs up and causes trouble.) Have a ten foot pole handy that you can poke through the crust and down through the water and feel the top of the solids, it feels spongy. When the solids are within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet "T" only then does the tank need to be emptied. If you check the tank twice a year, once in the spring and again in late summer, you will see that the tank fills during the winter and during the summer when the microbes are more active with the summer heat, it goes down. The anaerobic process works best at 97f, so a tank that is in the full summer sun, fills slower than one that's in the shade. Placing a green house over the septic tank to help keep it as warm as possible all year round is a good idea.
##-----------------------------------------------## Delivered via http://www.thestuccocompany.com/ Building Construction and Maintenance Forum Web and RSS access to your favorite newsgroup - alt.home.repair - 340658 messages and counting! ##-----------------------------------------------##
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The contractor found our long-untouched septic tank by probing around with a thin rigid rod. With a back-hoe he slickly dug down and found the cover in place, but cracked. He suggested we install a short vertical collar of plastic culvert with a plastic cap screwed on the top at ground level. The pumping people supplied the 20"-long culvert (my measurement), the plastic cap, and the stainless screws for $40. Forty-five minutes later I had glued the culvert/collar over the opening of the concrete tank, screwed the cap on top to keep curious folks out, packed soil around it, and sprinkled some grass seed. Fast, durable, inexpensive, just slightly visible after a year, and accessible for maintenance. My neighbor put a ring of flat rocks and some shrubs around his.
On Feb 14, 6:50pm, "JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com wrote:

Wood rots. Imagine being the person that steps on it the last time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob F wrote:

he SAID it was 20" underground . AND treated lumber takes 20+ years to rot anyway. Not to mention it could be inspected every three years when the tank is pumped.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.