Septic Tank and Water Softener

Hi,
I have a septic tank. I also have 3 water softener units (one is a softner, one is for iron removal and one is for tannin removal). Each runs on a 3 day cycle so one regenerates each night and flushes all the water into the drain. I just discoverd that these don't drain into the septic tank but just into a space in my back yard. I now know the answer to why that area is always soggy. Unfortunately the area has become a mosquito breeding ground and we have a 20 x 20 area of the back yard we really can't use.
I am doing renovations now and have the opportunity to re-route these to feed into my septic tank. My question is whether or not this is a bad thing for the septic tank? It is all water and no solid, but don't know enough about the details of septic to know for sure.
Any thoughts?
Alan
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Alan -- there are a lot of variables and I'm not a professional in this field, but let me make a few suggestions:
--Your system sounds a lot like mine, located in Central Florida. If you're in a similar location, there should be some way to minimize the soggy area -- perhaps with a slight change in grade, digging a dry well, or simply using the area for a garden with plants that like this environment.
-- If your soil is as sandy as mine, it should drain pretty quickly.
-- Have you considered having all three units cycle on the same day, which gives three days for the area to dry out?
-- Are you sure you need to recycle this frequently? I have mine recycling on 4 days and six days, which is adequate. Especially for the tannin-removal (a potassium permanganate unit?) you should be able to go six days or more before needing recycling.
-- If you don't have one already, consider adding a hose bib that draws water before it goes into the tanks, so that water you use for pressure washing, washing cars, watering the lawn, etc. doesn't deplete your chemicals.
-- My personal preference is to not send water to the septic tank that doesn't need treatment.
Regards --
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Thanks for the advice. The soil has a lot of clay and I can't really change the grade.
I will probably look at a dry well come spring then.
The guys that did the install suggested once every 3 days. The iron and tannin I have is pretty heavy.
All my outside taps come straight from the well so I am good there.

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Install a dry well. Don't drain into the septic tank.

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It depends on how big your septic system is.. If the tank is comfortable with the added through-put, and the leechfield can handle the water volume, you're not likely to poison the septic tank. But a separate drywell is still a better idea.
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what about the salt? when i asked the designer of my septic system, he most definitely said not to route that water in there.
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Short-term, unless you got a really cheap-ass system, or the effluent from the water purification is a big fraction of your total wastewater output, the salt load shouldn't be a significant issue. If it was, you'd have already killed the grass where you're dumping it now.
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i don't have one yet, but was considering it. i live in the az desert. no grass for a couple of miles. since it's only my wife and i, it just might be a large fraction.
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On Thu, 17 Nov 2005 12:14:34 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

Ah.. well, in that case, put in a drywell at the same time, for that and the washing machine. Neither one will destroy a properly built septic system, but they're not exactly helpful, either.
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On Thu, 17 Nov 2005 11:24:06 -0700, "Charles Spitzer"

Exactly The salt will destroy your septic.
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Why do you believe that?
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Goedjn wrote:

Dry wells are usually illegal in many areas.
The septic tank is where the best choice.
http://wqa.org/sitelogic.cfm?ID !2 http://www.epa.gov/ord/NRMRL/pubs/625r00008/html/fs3.htm http://tinyurl.com/63bq7
Gary Quality Water Associates www.qualitywaterassociates.com
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