septic problem

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What I did was look in our homeowner newsletter for a handyman/gardener type. I found one that had put in a lot of swales. He did a great job, but I felt really sorry for him. It was pouring rain when he did the job, and he was working in all that mud and soaking wet as well. He said he didn't mind, but I told him I was glad I had an inside job. :-) It took him two full days to put in 85-feet. That's a lot of rock to move in a wheelbarrow.
Dick
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Dick,
The furthermost use of hot water in my house is the washroom which is directly in back of the bath. Actually the usage starting with the furthermost would be washer, sink, shower. According to your directions where would the recirc be placed? And I do have a basement.
"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message

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A swale is a flow path, doesn't have to be done with stone. Makes it easier to cut the grass when there isn't stone in place.
"Dick" <LeadWinger> wrote in message wrote:

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Dick wrote:

Thanks for replying yet again! Oh, I bet that man felt a great sense of accomplishment in a job well done and most likely took pride in the fact that he didn't let the rain stop him. I can imagine him at the end of the day, warm and cozy after a shower, kicked back with his feet up enjoying a cup of coffee and feeling strong and healthy. Either that or he went on a two day bender , griping the entire time about his aching back and bones.. ;) I'd like to think it was the former. Gayle
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True, but here in Arizona they are always lined with rock. We don't have grass. :-)
On Sun, 3 Apr 2005 09:33:37 -0400, "Michael Baugh"

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gnb wrote:

And what pipe would this be? This cleanout you're talking about, it is between the house and the septic tank? Of so, pouring salt is just going to end up in the tank.
Is the pipe leading into the tank?
Or is the pipe access of a seepage pit (dry well)? --Mike
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Mike Fritz wrote:

The way I wrote that last post does make it sound like the pipe sticking out of the ground was clogged with tree roots, doesn't it? When we first moved here I had over-flowing toilets and water from the washing machine spilling out onto the floor when I first tried to do a load of laundry. The man who came to check it out said that the septic tank was full and that tree roots had grown into the pipes. Then he told us to put some salt into that pipe sticking above the ground. You're right, that would put the salt into the tank. Perhaps the roots had grown into the pipe going out of the tank and into the leach field? I have no idea, as you can probably tell by reading my posts. :) Anyway, I don't care about that pipe at all. I was only responding because someone took the time to reply to my original message. I was mainly concerned with my saturated leach field and the water bubbling out of the ground. Oh, I don't know what a seepage pit (dry well) is. I'll look it up. :) Gayle
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I could have written your message for you. You could change the location and it would be us.
The water bubbles up from the ground because the tank is (hopefully) lower than your toilets and drains in the house. It's only when the leach lines are mostly plugged that the water will start backing up into your house. As long as water from the tank can get to the leach lines, and there are enough openings, the water will take the path of least resistance and go up and or down from the leach pipe(s) into the earth.
You need to address the flooding in your yard. Otherwise, every time you get a heavy rain, you are going to saturate the leach field. Once that happens, things start backing up and you are left with the only option which is to pump out the tank again. Where we live it is $.32 per gallon to pump out a tank. Most of the ones around here are 1,000 or 1,200 gallon, so it is a costly proposition. We had ours pumped twice in January because of heavy rains. To add insult to injury, when the water in the leach field drains back into the tank, it's $.32 per gallon to pump that out too.
What we did was hire someone to put in what we call here in Arizona, "swales." They are little rock-lined channels that drain the excess water from your yard out to the street. We had 85' of swale installed, and haven't had standing water since.
We also took a look at our water usage to see what we could do to take the load off the septic system when it is having a problem with rain water saturation. We installed 1.6 gpf toilets, started limiting our showers to 5-minutes (with a 2-gallon/minute shower head), made sure we had full loads for our dishwasher and clothes washer before we ran them, and put in a hot water recirculating pump to stop running all the cold water down the drain while waiting for the hot water to show up in the sink and shower. By taking these steps we have been able to reduce our household water use age from 5 to 6,000 gallons per month down to 2,000 gallons. That's 3 to 4,000 gallons less each month that the leach field has to absorb. So far everything is running great.
Dick

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Are you sure that is a clean out pipe? Were we are all septic tanks have a pipe that looks like a clean out but if you open the cap it has a thing to switch the leach lines. 2 sets of leach lines in the field and you switch to the other set to give the soaked one a dry out time. Switch about every 6 months to a year.
Alternating leach field One of two or more leach fields designed to be used while the other(s) rest. They are generally fed via a manually operated diverter valve located in the line from the septic tank.
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snipped-for-privacy@here.now wrote:

Now that you mention it, maybe it isn't a clean out pipe afterall. Because the spetic guy digs the dirt away from the tank and pumps that way. Maybe he called it an access pipe. Hmm.. I'll have to ask my husband, but I do know for a fact that there is only one leach field. Thank you for taking the time to reply :) Gayle
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