Septic failure? stinky house!

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A std home inspection does not include a comprehensive septic inspection. They would look for poor flushing/draining within the house or obvious mushy places outside. A specific septic inspection/pumping would be required for anything further. Even at that, a general septic inspection would be limited to the tank caps/openings. A camera inspection down the lines is another $level$.

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Red Green wrote:

I would anticipate that inspector would walk the ground, know the home was in septic and any mushiness or smell would alert him to suggest that further investigation was necessary. Also professional inspector would be most likely have liability insurance. OP is looking at potential several thousand dollar problem.
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On Nov 20, 12:10 pm, tehaleks_at_gmail_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (tehaleks) wrote:

That sounds like a pipe that is carrying away rain water, most likely from the gutters. Could also be from a drain on a higher area, like where water would pool outside the house, etc. In which case, it needs to be able to let water run out on the ground and not be burried. That could also be a source of your excessive water. If someone routed the rain water to the area of the leach field, that isn't a good idea. Take a look next time it's raining, or if you see evidence of the same pipe at the gutter leaders, you could put a garden hose in and see if water comes out.
You need to convince your husband to get a septic system inspection ASAP.


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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

done. If hubby doesn't like it, that is his problem. The couple of hundred bucks (I am guessing on price here) would be worth it for peace of mind. Of course, if the company doing the inspecting tries to do a hard sell on an immediate replacement, then it is time to call 2-3 other companies and see what they say, and what prices they offer.
-- aem sends...
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tehaleks wrote:

http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Septic-failure-stinky-house-407383-.htm
We found a similar sounding area in our condo yard....weedy, little grass, not much growing. I started poking around and found a bunch of pavers just a couple of inches below the surface of the soil...must have been a patio long ago.

The lowest part of the site is where it gets "squishy"? That may be normal condition and have nothing to do with the septic.

Part of drainage system for downspouts or french drain?

I haven't seen any responses which haven't assumed that the septic is THE problem. It is likely part of the problem, but there isn't enough information about the site, soil type/saturation, weather conditions, etc.
Your local building department may have drawings that show where everything is located.
Run some water in all of the plumbing fixtures in the house so's you know the drain traps aren't dried out....if the sewer gas smell inside the house disappears, that is the answer to that particular. Sewer gas backs up into our guest bath occ. because the tub is rarely used and the trap dries out.
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Your next discussion needs to be at the other end of the yard.
But wait till a rain, make sure you don't have water ponding from simple poor drainage.
On Nov 20, 12:10 pm, tehaleks_at_gmail_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (tehaleks) wrote:

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tehaleks wrote: ...

Well, that's a problem there that (depending on what sort of arrangement the two of you have) may be your problem as well.
I agree w/ the other respondent's observation about possible dry traps if the house had been unoccupied for a while being a potential for some odor _inside_ the house but it has nothing whatsoever to do w/ the apparent problems w/ the drain field.
What success/failures have occurred at your prospective in-laws have nothing to do w/ the possible problems at this house other than his (false) perception that he hasn't had a problem there so surely there isn't on here.
What you need to get done ASAP as somebody else also mentioned is to find out from local county/city/whoever does permitting for septic systems is precisely where the drain field is located and any other information on file about inspections, etc. If the house isn't very old it might even be possible to get in contact w/ the builder.
The thing is that if there is a real problem as it sounds as is quite likely you need to get cracking on demonstrating same and documenting it in order to have any hope of any recourse against the seller for recovering some of the expense in repair. Of course, if they're bankrupt, there may be no point, but you surely don't want to lose the opportunity by procrastination.
It is possible there is a combination of problems as the other respondent also said owing to what appears to be a stormwater drain that may be too close to the drain field. Again, you need a professional assessment ASAP.
If the lot slopes as you say, it wouldn't seem likely that the problem of continually wet area would be associated w/ rain other than if it is helping to saturate the leach field by being directed onto it; otherwise it should run off.
I suppose it's possible depending on the area that there could be a natural wet-weather seep but that shouldn't, of course, have the septic odor.
As another said, if the prospective groom ain't a gonna' take action, do something proactive yourself would be my advice. At least it might stir him up... :)
Good luck w/ it...as noted earlier, btdt in a new house that was unfortunate enough to have had a poorly graded drain field that did require a new one to be installed. Symptoms as you describe... :(
--
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On Thu, 19 Nov 2009 16:39:45 +0000, tehaleks_at_gmail_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (tehaleks) wrote:

It should not stink, get it pumped out. Be extra careful what you flush down the toilet and what cleaners are used. Some septic tank owners add beneficial bacteria to the septic tank once or twice a month.
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I don't think they should just get it pumped out. Since they just bought it, they need to get it fully inspected and establish quickly if there is a problem or not while they may still have recourse. If the leach field is shot, pumping it out could give them a false sense that there is no problem. Everything will work fine until the tank fills up again, which could take some time with just 2 people living there. Especially when the fiance apparently wants to avoid adressing it.
 >Be extra careful what you

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tehaleks wrote:

I had one of these that when I replaced it the stinky smell went away.
http://www.ipscorp.com/studor/maxivent
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