Self-limiting washer hoses

Page 2 of 2  


I have not had a problem with the flow stopper check valve kicking in under normal use. My street utility pressure is 95PSI (fairly high for a municipality), the washer is a Maytag built in 1998, the hoses are fed with 5/8 copper, valves wide open. I suppose if you have a washer where the solenoid really opens full and fast it can cause the hose to think its a disconnect and the check valve will kick in though. I also installed them on my kitchen sink (as that sits right above the electrical panel in the basement). I can turn on the kitchen sink as fast as possible and the flow stopper does not kick in, but I hope it kicks in should it need to.
The real reason I bought these over the non-flow stoppers was because if you look closely at the Home Depot regular hoses they are really not stanless steel braided, they are silver nylon braided made to look like metal, (this ruse fools a lot of home depot shoppers). But the flow stopper ones were actually stainless braided and the real reason they cost so much more. I would never buy regular hoses at home depot simply because they are not really stainless steel (at least in my neighborhood), I go to Menards where all their hoses are stanless steel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

<<I have not had a problem with the flow stopper check valve kicking in under normal use. My street utility pressure is 95PSI (fairly high for a municipality), the washer is a Maytag built in 1998, the hoses are fed with 5/8 copper, valves wide open. I suppose if you have a washer where the solenoid really opens full and fast it can cause the hose to think its a disconnect and the check valve will kick in though. I also installed them on my kitchen sink (as that sits right above the electrical panel in the basement). I can turn on the kitchen sink as fast as possible and the flow stopper does not kick in, but I hope it kicks in should it need to.
The real reason I bought these over the non-flow stoppers was because if you look closely at the Home Depot regular hoses they are really not stanless steel braided, they are silver nylon braided made to look like metal, (this ruse fools a lot of home depot shoppers). But the flow stopper ones were actually stainless braided and the real reason they cost so much more. I would never buy regular hoses at home depot simply because they are not really stainless steel (at least in my neighborhood), I go to Menards where all their hoses are stanless steel.>>
I didn't notice that the used stainless steel look-a-likes. I guess I'll be keeping them, then. In a worst case scenario, it looks as if I can remove the small valve assembly in the hoses if they prove to be too much of a bother. Thanks for the input.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As a major appliance repairman, I can confidently tell you that Floodsafe brand hoses fail in normal operation by turning off water to the washer when there is no leak. Consequently, this often leads to an unnecessary service call.
I think that this product is a sort of belt and suspenders thing. You get the braided hoses, then you get an added feature that turns off the flow if the hose bursts. Braided hoses are enough for the average homeowner and people should quit worrying about the matter. It isn't rocket science to check your hoses. If they look or feel weak, change them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.