Self-adhering underlayment. Will it protect from leaks on a tile roof?

Hi:
I have a very leaky tile roof, which had been "repaired" a few years ago, but now it's leaking again. Only the paper was replaced, and it seemed like the thin regular kind. The major problem is the pine needles that block the channels in the tiles and i was told normally that wouldn't be a big problem except that the roof isn't steep enough.
I wish I had done more research in the past, but after doing a little more, I find out that there is something called self-adhering underlayment which is supposed to do a better job of keeping out water especially on less steep roofs. Replacing the entire roof with shingles would cost too much becuase it is a large single story ranch. Repairs would cost much less but I would like to know what I should be asking for in material when I contact a tile roofing repair specialist. With tile roofs, it's pretty much the underlayment and wood that needs to be replaced, the flashings in the valley and damaged wood.
So my question is because of the pine needles and the pitch of my roof, is there any way to reliably water and leak-proof it or would I have to go the shingle route? I was wondering if self-adhering underlayment along with synthetic paper would do the trick. And would copper valleys do a better job of water-proofing than the stainless steel ones I have?
Thanks
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1. It is not clear why you propose replacing a tiled roof with shingles.
2. The practical question for homeowners is whose advice you can trust: and the best answer is that of the roof contractors who did good similar work for your neighbours 5 or 10 years ago. If you know no one who employed roofers recently, nothing prevents your knocking on a stranger's door to ask who executed work you admire.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On Mon, 11 Oct 2010 09:31:53 -0400, "Don Phillipson"

would continue to clog up the channels in the tile and thus the best option was to replace the tiles with shingles. Tiles aren't too common...I see almost exlusively architectural or designer shingles in my town.
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The underlayment you're talking about would go a long way towards making your roof more weathertight, but if you're got a really low slope roof then the tile is just begging for problems. How little of a pitch do you have? With a tile roof I'd want longer lasting flashing, so copper, or what you have if it is indeed stainless. I've never seen stainless flashing around here in the NE. Are you sure it's not aluminum?
R
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Lamkin wrote:

What is the pitch? If at least 5:12 it should be OK.
I fail to see how adding *any* membrane - removing tiles, adding membrane, reinstalling tiles - would be less costly than just redoing with shingles but around here a usual underlayment (for barrel tiles, at least) is 90#, mineral coated , tarred roofing that is laid into hot tar. The tiles are then held in place with a trowel full of mortar, first course nailed. An alternate method is to nail all to battens which are nailed to the roof. I prefer mortar, no holes.
I don't have pine needles but I do have oak leaves. LOTS of oak leaves, took 3000# off the roof last spring. They too block the tiles but it really doesn't matter all that much as the waterproof part of the roof is the 90#. The solution to the oak leaves or - I would think - pine needles is to have them blown off once or twice a year.
I've never heard of stainless steel flashing but I don't think copper would be better.
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dadiOH
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