seeking advise for shed project

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I understand that desire.
I am in the planning process for a small shed myself. In my case there is no way to get a concrete truck anywhere near the site and that is way to much to mix by hand.
While I have not done the math yet to determine the exact specs, my initial plans are to dig 4 maybe six 18" round holes and pour at least 12" of concrete into each so that the 4 pads are level. If needed I may add an extra one on each side where the rim joists will be.
Then I plan to mortar set (final leveling) one of those precast deck post bases that you buy at the BORG. Frame up the floor using PT lumber supported by those bases, cover with deck boards, frame up the walls and roof it.
The last time I built one of these I just set PT 4x4 posts in concrete and built from there since I was building over an old blacktop driveway. Not sure I trust this new PT stuff for ground rated contact hence the modified plan. Also this time I need a floor.
The hardest part is going to be achieving level for all the footer holes.
Building codes do not apply to such a small "non-permanent", movable structure here. Make sure you are okay on that score.
--
Colbyt
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On Sat, 11 Jul 2009 16:21:27 -0400, "Colbyt"

I am not sure about what it is like in the frozen north but here in Florida concrete pumps are everywhere and not real busy right now. You can get one to pump for $50-75. Sure beats a wheelbarrow. I would pour the floor as a monoslab footer and pour an apron in front of the door location while he was there. Think about where else you want some concrete and do it too. If you order a "safe" amount, you will usually have some left over. It is easy to drag that pump hose somewhere else to use the rest.,
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On Jul 11, 5:15�pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

or rental places have a powered concrete mover, or even a small trailer loaded with concrete.
concrete is nearly always the best floor and lasts forever.......
remember too wway too many regret not making their shed larger.........
never met a single person who complained I made it too big.........
consider larger, it costs just a little more and can be very useful
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bob haller wrote:

Depends, around here we pay pretty stiff school taxes charged according to property valuation. Small sheds that are not on a permanent foundation are exempt. Go a little bigger and you will find yourself paying an extra $300/year in taxes.
This is especially true after the last assessment where they were very aggressively trying to put a value on anything so they could tax it.

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snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

I built a 12x20 shed ten years ago and lived in it while I built my house.
I dug cinder blocks down to hard clay and leveled them with sand. The floor is PT 2x6 supported by the cinder blocks along the outside walls and down the centre, covered with 3/4" tongue and grove plywood.
It's standard 2x4 construction, insulated, with 8 ft walls and trusses for the roof, sheathed with 1/2" aspenite and vinyl siding. It has survived windstorms strong enough to break down trees next to it. It was insulated because it got too cold to stay in it when the temps dropped below -40 deg. (That is a minus)
Unless you are on a swamp there is no need for piles below the frost line with a building that size. It will move fairly evenly with the frost without any damage. My house is built on thirty three, twenty foot piles but that's another story.
I'm in a location where the frost goes down five or six feet. The shed is as solid as the day it was built and short of a tornado hit will likely outlast me.
I store all my junk including a garden tractor in it.
Why do you want it a foot above the ground? I purposely kept mine as low as I could to make it easier to move things in and out.
Bottom line, it's just a shed. Take a look at what the box stores call a shed then ask yourself how deep to dig the piles. :)
LdB
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