Security cams

I want to set up a security cam at an abandoned farmstead. One that is motion activated and would take a few pictures. It would be nice if it had wifi and I could transfer the pictures to an Ipod or a computer. Solar powered would be nice also. My thought is to put it on a power pole so it can't easily be stolen. That's one reason I'd like the wifi connection so the pictures would already be in a safer location. I've done a bit of searching online but don't have any practical experience with such things. Thanks for any advice or comments.
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On 2012-06-16, Dean Hoffman <""> wrote:

You can buy a digital (get digital, not analog) recorder w/ half doz cameras for under $500. Another option is to set up an old desktop box with Linux and use Zoneminder. I'm looking at a guruplug + zoneminder to set up a server/website so I can monitor my Alzheimers mom from my cellphone.
http://www.zoneminder.com / http://plugcomputer.org/plugwiki/index.php/ZoneMinder
nb
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On 6/16/2012 6:30 AM, Dean Hoffman > wrote:

Might consider in looking at game cameras such as at Cabelas:
http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/browse/_/N-1100176?WTz_l=SBC%3BMMcat104791680
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Dean Hoffman wrote:

Search the web for a product called a "trail-cam".
These are cameras typically used by hunters and biologists that are mounted to trees in remote areas where animals (bears, deer, etc) are known or thought to pass by. They are battery powered and run for 6 months to a year on a fresh set of batteries and can take thousands of pictures during that time. They are motion activated and some can take video. Some have infra-red LED lighting and can take great pictures in the black of night.
The pictures are stored on conventional SD-ram memory cards.
Now, there are some SD-ram cards that have built-in wifi radios, meaning that pictures stored on them are immediately available over a wifi network. If you combine that sort of SD-ram card with a trail-cam then you'd have your solution.
But having a working wifi (internet) connection on an abandoned farmstead would probably mean more cost than it's worth, so you'd be better off just returning to the site every few days or weeks to access the camera and retrieve any pictures it took.
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On 6/16/2012 7:55 AM, Home Guy wrote:

trail cams was my first thought also. But a couple of points:
1. they will (at best) only take a shot after a 15 second delay
and
2. they are not compatible with the eye-fi cards (been there, tried that)
just FYI.
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Steve Barker wrote:

Not sure where you're getting that info from. I don't see why they'd need to have (or would have) a 15-second delay between motion-detection and picture-taking.
None of the reviews I've ever read about trail-cams mention any sort of delay. These cameras are usually always rated based on night-vision quality and field-of-view and distance-range of the motion detection.

============http://www.eye.fi /
What is Eye-Fi?
The first memory card to automatically upload photos using WiFi.
Any camera
Works with your camera and stores media just like regular SDHC cards.
http://www.eye.fi/how-it-works/basics
The Eye-Fi card is the 1st wireless memory card. It looks, stores media, and fits into cameras just like a regular SDHC card. On top of that, the Eye-Fi card has built-in Wi-Fi that effortlessly transfers photos and videos to your iPhone, iPad, Android device or computer.
During the quick set-up, you customize where you want your memories sent. The Eye-Fi card will only send them to the computer and to the sharing site you choose. Pick from one of over 25 popular sites ============= If they've designed these card correctly, then I don't see how or why they wouldn't work in any device that has an SD-ram slot.

What trail-cam have you owned / operated?
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On 6/16/2012 9:39 AM, Home Guy wrote:

My info comes from the 7 i own. Multrie and the Wildgame are the two brands i have. You can dance in front of them both and the closest setting there is , is 15 seconds.
as for the eye-fi, well the device you stick it in has to be eye-fi compatible. game cams are not. There's a list on their web-site if you had bothered to actually educate yourself, as to what they will work in.
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Steve Barker full-quoted:

===http://www.trailcampro.com/recontalonbasic.aspx
Recon has updated their units to speed up the trigger time. Previous models had a sluggish trigger time at around 4 seconds. New models snap a picture in the sub 2 second range.
http://www.trailcampro.com/ReconTalonIR1.3mpxlReview.aspx
The main drawback to the Talon ex is it's detection capability. Our tests indicated a trigger time in the mid 4 second range and sensing that was slightly below similarly priced models.
http://www.trailcampro.com/bushnelltrophycamhdreview.aspx
The detection circuit on the new Trophy Cam really stands out. The trigger speed is 0.596 seconds (80th percentile of trail cameras) and the recovery time is down to 2.9 seconds. This is easily best in class for sub $200 cameras. ==== http://www.trailcampro.com/triggerspeedshowdown.aspx
Out of 22 camera tests, 18 of them triggered under 2 seconds (including several from Moultrie).
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