Securing Outlet box in a Tight Place

I relocated an outlet to a location where I just could not manage to nail it to the stud. I attached it using Liquid Nails. Is this method "acceptable"?
The builder had attached the box with 2 small screws (with metal screwheads exposed inside the box)...any comments on this method?
Joe
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Why didn't you just use an "old work" box? It has ears that fold in so you can push the box into the wall and then they fold out to catch the inside of the drywall when you tighten the screws.
Bobby
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Bobby_M wrote:

My guess is "I didn't know"!
I'll have to rummage around HD and see all the options they have.
Thanks for cluing me.
In the meantime, is what I did "okay" or should I swap it out with a differently mounting box?
Joe
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Will it hold up to someone REALLY firmly plugging something in, or someone tripping over a cord plugged into it?
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John Harlow wrote:

Absolutely. I'm quite sure I could not get the box off without getting into the joint with a prying tool and busting the plastic box apart.
But I don't really know what Liquid Nails is like after 30 years and I don't know if such an attachment is "legal".
Joe
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Brittle.
Not Code-compliant, at any rate.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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Joe S wrote:

There are "old work" boxes with flanges that spread to either side, which won't work in a hole that's right next to a stud or other obstruction. There are others that have little ears that rotate outward at the top and bottom, which require a little clear space above and below but not to the sides.

Chip C
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I have seen electrian's on some job sites use screws when they could not nail. When they installed the outlet they would wrap electrial tape around the outlet.
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Are you sure you can't put in a screw at an angle or with an offset screwdriver? It won't be easy but might be possible, even on a single wide box.
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Having screws inside the box isn't a real problem, imho. I hang handy boxes and I use screws to mount them.
Pluse when you hang metal boxes, the recetacle is 'surrounded' by metal. Just remember to turn in all you unused terminal screws for safety.
imho,
tom
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it. I wouldn't trust Liquid Nails to stay secure for the projected installed life of the box.

like having any way for a current-carrying conductor to energize metal that goes outside the box.
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Why are metal screws any more or less dangerous than metal nails?
At least with the metal boxes we have in our house, I have seen that some are attached with roofing-like nails (large head) and others with drywall screws. I would have thought that grounding protected the boxes.
Are you referring to plastic boxes when you say that internal screws are not allowed?
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wrote:

Screws into the structure is what I would have done. Adhesive is definitely a no-no, besides it is flammable. The ground wires are exposed in the box as well.
A craftsman would train the wires so that there are no exposed conductors or grounded surfaces in contact with the current carrying wires. Some might even use electrical tape to cover up the screws on the sides as additional protection.
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I think these can be secured right on the edge, rather than going through the side with screws.
http://www.chopurl.com?704
I've heard if you disassemble them, mount the base first, then screw in the box is easier in tight areas.
hth,
tom
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