securing exterior doors


Our home has several exterior passage doors, and a discussion on the combo screws reminded me to post a little thing I did to gain security when out of town.
On all the inswing doors, I installed eyebolts into the studs on either side. They were painted to help blend into the drywall color and also most were behind drapes anyway. I then bought some fairly decent chain and reusable links, cutting the chains to span the gap between the eyebolts. In several cases, where a drape or toolbox hid one of the eyebolts, I just left the one link and chain connected to the eyebolt, but where exposed, the chains were removed and stored. Then, when leaving for an extended period of time, I simply clip the other end of the chain to the eyebolt, spanning the door with the chain. Someone can still kick in the door, but swinging it open will be presented with the chain blocking the door.
--
Nonny


Luxury cars now offer a great seating option for politicians.
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I've not seen drapes hanging or tool boxes stored behind an inswing door? Your place may be different. Another hard kick on the door would cause the eyebolts to pull out? Or use some cutters to cut the chain.
In fact it would be easier access, to use a spring loaded punch (HF model) to knock out a tempered glass pane. Remove the chain and haul all the booty away.
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Nonny wrote the following:

What do you do about the windows, which is the most common entry for burglars?
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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In general, it is all but impossible to make a house inpregnable to a determined burglar.
Back when (60s?), I think it was Popular Mechanics had a series on building "lockbox" for a vacation home in the boonies. Found it burglarized the next spring :).
Harry K
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wrote:

Right. You just make it more difficult to break into your house than the neighbor's.

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Bill, there's little that can be done. In our case, the two primary doors I secured with the inside chain across them are opposite our side-wall block wall. In some other areas, the burglars lean against the block wall, and use their feet to kick the doors in. There's less noise than if they break out a glass.
Regarding the good people recommending a cross bar instead of the chain, consider how "tight" the chain might be and how little compliance there would be to permit a bolt cutter to reach around a broken door. The chain used is not insignificant, either, FWIW.
For the rear patio door, I have a rod that is mounted across the slider to prevent its opening. Sure, a creep can break out the glass to enter, but the wedged bar along with security precaution on the inactive door literally force the burglar to break out the glass. Other windows, not fixed ones, are drilled and secured with an eyebolt in the spot where the lower and upper sashes meet. Again, a rock overcomes this security measure, but at least it'll make noise- no prying would open them.
Inside, I have 3 130dB sirens feeding off a relay from the alarm panel. If a door/window magnetic contact is broken OR if an interior PIR is triggered OR if a garage IR beam is broken, the sirens go off for 5 minutes. The sirens are INSIDE- not outside- but neighbors can hear them. The point is to panic a burglar into departing ASAP if they get inside. This is effective. Once, a neighbor brought over a bowl of chili for us in anticipation of our return from a trip. He entered the front door, triggering the 30-second entry delay, but forgetting to turn off the alarm. When the 3 sirens went off, he as so startled he dropped the dish with the chili on the floor of the kitchen and fled. He returned after the siren went silent to clean up, but a year later, we're still finding pieces of glass in corners or behind the refrigerator. <Grin>
Nobody is so dumb that they think a home is impregnable. All you can do is to make it difficult and noisy for a burglar to enter, and make it more uncomfortable for them to stay and search for things.
--
Nonny
When we talk to God, we're praying,
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Nonny wrote:

Which renders the door with the same - albeit slightly stronger - protection as those piddly chain-locks that can be defeated with bolt cutters slid through the cracks.
A much better scheme is brackets on either side and a 2x4 between the two.
Even better is a diagonal brace from the door to some stopping point some feet away (i.e., wall).
If you REALLY want to do it, there are doors with moveable pins attached to the doorknob that sink into all four sides of a door, much like the bolts in a safe door..
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HeyBub wrote:

Even more fun, Browning has an actual safe door that is disguised as a normal 6 panel residential door, and comes complete with a remote electronic lock control.
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Pete C. wrote:

Cool!
The Texas Prison system (and maybe others) has a division called "Texas Prison Industries." It makes stuff.
The "stuff" is "sold" to other government agencies in the state. Amongst the "stuff" they make are (heh) doors. Here are some:
http://www.tci.tdcj.state.tx.us/products/metal/security/DOORS/default.aspx
It's a hoot to prowl around the site looking at all the neat stuff made by the inmates - from school busses to saddles. I understand the prison system itself is amazingly self-supporting. They grow their own food (except for such things as coffee and pepper) including cattle, eggs, pork, etc. They grow cotton, gin it, turn it into cloth, and make uniforms, clothing, mattresses, etc. Quite an operation.
When an inmate "graduates," he's often learned a useful skill, such as hoeing cotton, gathering eggs, making grits, and so forth. Lest you shrug that off, imagine how hard it is to collect enough eggs for 175,000 inmates' breakfast!
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HeyBub wrote:

Prolly why Texas has one of the highest incarceration rates in the country- they need a steady supply of warm bodies to staff their plantations. The Feds are following their model- they have a large vehicle repair depot at Bastrop (sp?), staffed by prisoners. Always wondered how the border patrol guys feel about being out in the middle of nowhere, depending on a 4x4 that was last rebuilt by somebody they locked up a few months ago? (never buy an ex border patrol 4x4- they purely beat the crap out of them...)
--
aem sends...

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HeyBub wrote:

Interesting that they manufacture diapers.
TDD
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This security bar is much more secure and much easier to install:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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