Securing copper pipes and heat expansion


Yet another newbie plumbing question :-)
So I have most of my pipes back where I want them. In one place I come out of the floor with a hot water pipe, elbow, elbow, elbow, connect to shower valve. I tee out of this and elbow, elbow, elbow, and stick out the wall for sink (I know, hard to picture exactly what it looks like, but there are about six elbows total because that is what it takes to get the pipe where it is needed lol)
Question - if I secure the pipes to the wall here and there, will the stress of warming and cooling pipes that are fastened to wall and have a bunch of elbows here and there cause premature failing, or is the pipe strong enough to take the stress? I'm using copper, rigid, 3/4 to shower valve, 1/2 from the tee to sink valve.
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Leave a little slack in the supports so the pipe doesn't get clamped tight. The idea is support, not rigidity. also place your supports such that minor expansion is allowed, like away from the tees, other fittings. If your soldering techniques are good, there will be no problems. If you have doubts about your skills, there are some pretty good video clips on YouTube that will be useful.
Joe
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Joe wrote:

And use copper or plastic supports. You don't want steel in contact with the pipe.
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A sleeve of some material like soft cloth or even cardboard between the pipes and the clamps will allow them to move slightly without the clanking that will occur if they are held more rigidly.
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Excellent advice, all of you, that was what I needed to know - tyvm!
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Dear Tyvm, I'll second that, about steel clamps being not OK. I've seen enough rubbed-through copper tubing in my life.
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Christopher A. Young
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The entire mess holds itself inplace pretty well. The shower elbow and diverter elbow are brass and screw to the wall studs. I'm using just a few copper brackets in a few places, and I put them over the elbows and not directly over the pipe itself. With a bit of luck, this plumbing job will last longer then I will <gg>
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On Feb 15, 7:45pm, "Stormin Mormon"

A little late to the party, but this is what I've been using for the last couple of years. http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/%28f5cbrdyxygpl0wmbcjlcn0md%29/productdetails.aspx?sku=4203949
R
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Think of what an expansion joint consist of. Basically it is a "U" that id placed somewhere in the middle of a long run that allows some flex when the long run expands and contracts. With so many turns it sounds like you may already have this type of flex built into your plumbing. Don't get too carried away with clamping it down, you can leave a little slop in it.
Jimmie
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