Sears incompetence

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Same shit with Home Crapo or any other store that out sources their installers. No control over them.
Steve Kraus wrote:

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inĚcomĚpeĚtence : the state or fact of being incompetent
inĚcomĚpeĚtent 2 : inadequate to or unsuitable for a particular purpose 3 a : lacking the qualities needed for effective action b : unable to function properly
Facts only:
I purchased a range hood for my mom from sears.com (local store pickup). It was to replace a defective old unit (same nominal size, duct and wiring already there).
I phoned Sears to arrange installation. They said this would be accomplished by their preferred contractor, a company called (I think) Custom Appliance Installers. I believe they are out of Orland Park, IL.
The contractor called and my mom told them it's possible that the adjacent cabinet might have to get moved over an eighth of an inch or some tiles cut to clear the different side dimensions of the new unit. "We don't do that," she was told. Sears called back and left a message saying they were cancelling. <Snip>
Moving a cabinet a half inch is just as much work as moving it across the room. I doubt you would find many appliance installers willing to do the cabinet work.
How to you trim installed tile on a wall? Again, I doubt you would find an appliance installer equiped to do that kind of job.
I can understand your frustration, wanting to help your mother and being some distance away and having to rely on unknown people to do a job. But, stop and rethink for a minute. Is it possible you are being a bit unreasonable in your expectations?
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On Thu, 11 Jan 2007 15:00:19 GMT, Steve Kraus

First, let's assume everything you stated was correct. Even so, it's only half the story. Why did they need to enlarge the install space? Was that by the manufacturer's instructions?
This is what I'm guessing, the vendor gets a flat rate. So performing the work in as little time possible means there is a greater chance for profit, and a larger one. So they don't want to do extra work, so they will only do what they have to.
tom @ www.FreelancingProjects.com
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:

I agree with those that say that Sears, to their credit, had the good sense to understand what their contractors are capable of doing and what they cannot do. Installing a range hood in a std space is one thing. Moving cabinets, even an 1/8", unless it happens to be the last one and there is room next to it is a whole different thing. And even worse, is cutting some tiles that are cemented to brick as part of a kitchen backsplash. You should be happy they didn't send some guy who tried to do it and screwed the whole thing up, which is what they probably know from experience can happen.
As for the details of the install, I can understand the issue with the existing tile being cut in around the old unit. But the requirement I see is that you need a hood that is slightly bigger than the old one so that it covers up all the area in back that doesn't have tile. It sounds like the new one is indeed bigger, but you want the excess tile cut away so the hood will go back an additional 3/8" like the old one. Why is that necessary? Usually the front back dimension is not critical and trying to get tile that is cemented to a brick wall cut and off without damaging the remaining tile doesn't sound like an typical install issue to me, nor something I would want to do.
I still don't understand the need to move the cabinet because of the tile though. If the old one was the same nominal as the new one, it should just go straight in, no?
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