Sealing wood to foundation joint

I'm looking at some ideas on how to seal my basement and one thing that I notice is that all the joints where the framing meets the foundation are open. I don't mean drafty, I mean I can look through the gap and see the neighbor's house clearly.
So I'm looking at this thing and wondering how can I seal this? There are two ways in my mind that I'd like to think about
1) Permanent but not proper, some sort of sealing foam or something. How would I do this if I didn't care about correctly fixing but still fixing.
2) Correct solution. What is the correct way to solve this? How would I seal the gaps in a way that a carpenter would accept? Lift the house up, remove the framing and lay down new boards??? If new boards are layed down, how do I bond them to the cement?
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Say what? Lifting the house is a bit of an extreme solution, IMO. Seal it with spray foam or caulk and be done with it
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Depending upon whereyou live, and given what sounds like sill plates not bolyed down tight to the foundation, you might want t tink about some additional metal plates at each exterior wall stud location tying he s sikll plate tightly to the foundation for earthquake protection.
Its a big issue, and becoming a huge factor in insurance rates ib a lot mote places than just the traditional California worry spots. Missouri, Illinois, Arkansas, Washington State, Oregon, etc. are all having serious issues in this regard.
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Jim McLaughlin

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"Jim McLaughlin" <jim.mclaughlin> wrote in message

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Try your local building inspectors for what is approved in your area.
Around here its a hole drilled with a hamer drill, and an insert epoxied ino the hole and the lower portion of the metal strap bolted into th epoxied insert in the hole, with the other end lag screwed into the wooden part of the sill plates.
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Jim McLaughlin

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