Sealing a hard-to-reach galvanized line...

I'm trying to seal an open galvanized drain line (1930s era) that's embedded in my masonry walls. The line is about 6 inches in the wall, and rather difficult to get to.
There aren't any threads left (all broken or rusted off) to screw a cap in.
What do I do at this point? I tried a test-plug and I still get some leakage around the edges.
Any advice?
-Matt
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On Feb 14, 9:51�pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

replace with PVC line........... Hammer drill is your friend, re route line if possible.
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The whole house was replaced with PVC in 2004, except for this one line (which is in the same wall as the joint where all of the PVC ties to the sewer).
-Matt
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On Feb 15, 7:22 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Can you get something that 'almost fits' fill up its thread with lots of glue; perhaps two part epoxy etc.? then screw it into the offending opening. Also perhaps squeeze extra epoxy in and around the 'sort of screwed in' plug item through a short piece of hose or pipe? Just an idea? Worth trying? May be an alternative to digging and possibly disturbing more plumbing?
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Okay, I tried this:
I filled the pipe with insta-foam, and that basically didn't work very well. My test-plug solution failed as well. Sooooo:
I built a 'slug' out of five 1.25 inch washers, and 2 washers the next size up. I bolted them together, and took some of the fast-dry epoxy, and sealed the assembly.
I then shaved down the pipe using a wire brush (attached to a long drill bit extension), so that I could get back to bare, clean metal. Once that was clean, I mixed up some JB Weld around the slug and in the hole, and slid the slug into the collar of the pipe. I slathered it on, until there was basically a 1/8 to 1/4 inch seal over the slug and the pipe.
It doesn't necessarily look pretty, but, I waited 24 hours for it to dry, and tested it out:
Worked Beautifully.
Thanks to all -Matt
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Matt,
This is a drain line so it's very low pressure. Get or make a rubber boot of the appropriate size and attach it with a hose clamp. you can get rubber sheeting and hose clamps at auto parts stores if your hardware store doesn't have pipe boots.
Dave M.
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it will just leak again and me a issue at home resale time. bite the bullet and replace it for forever fix
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On Feb 14, 6:51pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I assume you jusst want to seal it off.
If the line is not used anymore and there is very little pressure, you could try a can of expanding foam. Shove a plug of wadded up paper in about 6" and fill the rest with foam. Clean the interior of the pipe as much as possible before doing it.
Harry K
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Generous doses of heavy grease inside the line, to seal the test plug. Or, silicone caulk. But not both.
--
Christopher A. Young
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