Screw Extractor for tiny laptop screws?

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I've stripped two of the screws holding the hard drive in my laptop (apparently lock-tite'd, from the crack! noise the other two made when unscrewed in my best philips screwing technique). (The chat agent on the line unhelpfully had just asked me to try removing the HD and memory, which is the rough equivalent in this model of ``remove roof and temporarily set aside'' for home repairs, as you have to remove the screen and keyboard to get at the memory. It must have been a little chat-agent joke. Anyway that project stopped when the screws stripped.)
I take it the next step is a screw extractor, which I see too large a variety of to make a choice. What's the most probably successful kind of screw extractor? I have no experience with extractors. I'd experiment, but would like to get it done as neatly as possible on the first try.
Very tiny philips screw. A 3/32 drill fits in the hole left by the other, removed, screws.
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If they are not broken but just stripped and cant catch a thread maybe crazy glue the screwdriver to the screw then pull up to catch the thread , use a bit of alcohol or laquer thinner to clean screw and driver so they bond, or raise the screw with a knife while trying to screw out to catch a thread first, since it wont come outr but turns im guessing there is thread that just wont bite
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ransley wrote:

It's the head I stripped. The threads are fine. I suspect it's been lock-tite'd, causing the stripped head in the first place.
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Have you trying heating the screws with a small-tip soldering iron? Heat should dissipate fast enough not to cause any damage to drive. Otherwise, drilling-out would be another alternative.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I was thinking of heating up the screw exactor bit and using that, once I settle on which extractor to use. The screw is so short that I think drilling to start an extractor is not possible; I'd need one that goes from what's there or makes its own hole as necessary, I think.
I don't know that it was lock-tite'd, but the other two screws make the lock-tite sound when they broke loose and unscrewed. No visible residue however.
I'd like to avoid putting metal shavings in the case but don't see how to avoid it, since it's essentially laproscopic surgery to work on it.
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Sometimes they use a lacquer or similar stuff instead of LocTite...so a little heat may help. If the screws aren't brass...you could magnetize the bit to keep them from scattering.
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On Tue, 7 Oct 2008 07:31:39 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

They are no doubt screwed into plastic. Heat the screw with the tip of a soldering iron, and the screw will come out easily, regardless of any lock-tite, lacquer or epoxy that was used.
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screwing into plastic really doesn't need any Lock-tite. some "lock-nuts" use a plastic insert to keep the nut from vibrating loose.
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Ron Hardin wrote:

other way, to un-seize the threads. Or if the head breaks off, just use packing tape when I reinstall. Those drives are so tiny, 2 screws will take the weight- you just need to keep it from flopping around in there.
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If you suspect locktite, heat the head of the screw with a soldering iron before removing. The heat breaks the bond.

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On Tue, 7 Oct 2008 04:57:23 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com

No, but it'll melt the laptop case. The insert where the screw is set will come free and there will no longer be a means to keep the laptop drive in place other than duct tape.
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On Tue, 07 Oct 2008 09:52:01 -0500, AZ Nomad

A minimal level of manual dexterity, intellect, and skill is assumed.
If the insert comes out, glue it back in. That's hardly a problem.
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If you had intellect, you wouldn't be applying heat to a plastic case.
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On Tue, 07 Oct 2008 11:41:57 -0500, AZ Nomad

Done it probably hundreds of times with no problem. Used to work on some pretty expensive devices where assembly was done by a machine that force threaded screws into plastic without first making a pilot hole. The screws were essentially "welded" into the plastic. The same devices also have some parts with metal inserts for machine screws. Often had to deliberately pull the insert and then glue it back.
This is basic stuff for anyone who does this sort of work.
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Ron Hardin wrote: ...

I'd try one of two things...
1. If you are well acquainted w/ the local jeweler/watchmaker type, take it into him. They've got all the miniature tools and skill set needed.
2. A spring-loaded "impact" driver w/ the appropriate tip.
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Why do you insist on giving advice that you haven't tried. The is absolutely zero chance of crazy glue sticking well enough to break the screw free.
zero nada zilch.
All crazy glue will do is stick to your fingers and make a mess.
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Use very small needle nose pliers, one tip in the center of the screw, the other tip around the outside of the screw.
And take a mallet to your head if you weren't using jewelers' screwdrivers from the start.
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Ron Hardin wrote:

I've removed small stripped Phillips head screws with a Dremel tool. I first cut a slot for a flat blade screwdriver and if that doesn't work, it's time to play dentist. There are also the Alden brand Grabit screw extractors that work very well.
http://www.aldn.com/grabit /
TDD
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That's great if you're working on a car.
Laptop's don't use #6-#14 screws.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

the hard drive are? Did you notice "Dremel tool" not hacksaw or die grinder? I can remove extremely tiny stuck screws with my Dremel tool. I have some cutting tips that are not much bigger than the head of a pin.
TDD
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