screeching garage door

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Good Morning,
I'm in a rental and the garage door screeches in certain spots. It's a metal to metal sound. I noticed in Home Depot hey sell a tube of stuff (grease I suppose) for this purpose. Should I use that or is there something less expensive or better.
Thank in advance, bonnie
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Better to replace the rollers with new ones, that is likely the source of your issue. I bought some nylon ones with ball bearings and my garage door has been quiet and easy to operate for the last two years. Unfortunately this is likely a two (strong) person job.
nate
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I'd use hte grease first myself-- But I've replaced some rollers over the years and it was a simple matter of removing 3 bolts & sliding in a new roller.
No strength needed- do it with the door closed. Maybe Nate's door was assembled differently. Hope your is like mine.
Jim
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To replace *all* of them, I had to disassemble the door completely and then reassemble it a section at a time. Each section had to be cocked at an angle to insert the rollers, and then I dropped it down on top of the previous section. Then I had to lift it up without the springs attached (takes a strong person) and have a helper hold it open while I reattached the springs. (she was not happy about the speed at which I was able to reattach the springs...)
Of course my door was installed in the 80's and apparently had had no maintenance since then (previous owners did not actually use the garage, so the door was only used infrequently, I guess they didn't mind the noise and having to clean and jerk the door every time they wanted to open it.)
I also had to replace the lock assembly as it'd jammed at some point in the past and their "solution" was to remove one of the bars from it. Oddly enough I had to order this part off the web as nobody local stocked it.
nate
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Buy a $3.00 spray can of wd-40 and spray the rollers, the roller bearings, the track, and the main guide track with it. Run the door up and down a few times. I bett that solves the problem, it did for me. As a renter this is the cheapest thing to do.
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wrote:

If that works, I'd go back and put some real oil in the bearings. WD-40 is a good solvent but any lubricating properties will evaporate in a week or so. I missed the part about "rental" in my first read through. I'd certainly replace the rollers if it were a place I was planning on staying for more than a year or two, but that may not apply.
nate
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WD will give you a quick answer to the question "will lube quiet it". But the stuff evaporates off, in days to weeks. The next lube can be something more long lasting. Castle Thrust, and white lithium come to mind.
--
Christopher A. Young
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How in the hell did you determine that... from all the way over there in Obliviousland?
She might need new rollers, but throwing a little grease at it first seems a bit more of a rational strategy. -----
- gpsman
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Contrary to popular belief, grease on the tracks of a garage door really doesn't do a whole lot other than mess up your nice shirt when you inadvertantly bump into the tracks on your way to an important meeting. Think about it - they're rollers. Supposed to roll, hence the name. If there's sliding friction between the roller and the track, the bearings are already tight. Now greasing the bearings in the rollers might help, but by the time they start making noise, they're likely already sloppy and due for replacement - and it's worth the $20 or so for the new rollers rather than to have to smush bearing grease into the likely marginal old rollers, which likely takes just as much time as replacing them.
If one has a real grease gun and a needle tip, that might make the process quicker and neater, but I still suspect a marginal, temporary fix. I've never even tried, since rollers of higher quality than comes with any garage door are so cheap.
nate
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Who said "tracks", you moron?

<spit take> The way you'd grease them, and with the attention you apply to your personal movement, I'm sure you're speaking from experience... for a change.

Lol. They call 'em roller bearings too, numbnuts. That doesn't suggest they don't need lubrication. -----
- gpsman
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Several posters, and it seems to be (inexplicably) a common practice.

I *wouldn't* grease them, that was my point. And I suppose you've never tried to navigate a dark garage at 0-dark-hundred while carrying a portfolio and a roll or two of blueprints?

No, they're called *ball* bearings. Not that that's pertinent, but still. Or do you have some super high end garage door that actually does use roller bearings?
Read the rest of my message, where I explained that $4/roller in my own personal cost/benefit calculation was cheap when compared to the tedium of greasy fingers from hand packing the (likely completely worn out) rollers.
you're pretty close to going *four* groups (or the coveted "general news server ignore poster" award)... you ain't stalking me are you? Look, this isn't about your weird obsession with trying to "prove" me "wrong" whenever I post, it's about providing good advice to the original poster.
nate
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well my experience. my door got stiff and noisy, had never done anything to it, door must be about 20 years old.
so I lubed it with light oil, one of those zoom spout oilers I use for work.....
that about 2 years ago. its quiet easy to move up and down.
I added oil door to my every few year maintence items.:) I honestly had never thought about it:(
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I bet that would work if you oiled it at the first sign of trouble. My hunch, and it is just a guess at this point since the OP did not specify, is that she just moved into the place and found the door in an unmaintained condition. My experience is that if a door is stiff/noisy and left that way for years, the best course of action is replacement parts - mine was so bad that one of the cables would slip off of its pulley because the pulley bearing was so loose and wobbly, also rollers would jump out of track for same reason (not to mention bent track) in a situation like that the door can literally be dangerous to open for an unaware person and/or person of limited strength.
If I'm wrong, and the OP has been in the house for a while and the door *used* to work perfectly but now is noisy, you may be correct.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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again my 20 year old door had never been lubed, embarased to say i lived here the entire time and never gave it a thought till door got stiff and noisey.....
a little oil 2 years ago and its been fine ever since:)
YMMV
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Apparently, determining relevance isn't your strong suit.

You forgot to mention your "nice" shirt.
Quit pretending you're anything other than a delivery boy. You tote blueprints to and fro for engineers, while Bullisesquely attempting to impersonate an engineer on Usenet, all day, every working day.

Apparently, determining relevance isn't your strong suit.

I'm still focusing upon your worthless evaluation from Obliviousland.

My numerous effortless escapes support my assertions you're too stupid to operate a killfile.

Yeah, I'm stalking you...

Lol. I just point it out, and why you're wrong, then I "troll" you into making an even bigger idiot of yourself.
Abusing dimwits is my hobby, you know that (or should, by now).

Right, for a change, so STFU. -----
- gpsman
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efirst try some basic lubricating oil, a pump oiler works well. put on tracks, rollers.ll metal to metal contact points. it highl;y possible your door has never been oiled.
honestly its really the landlords responsiblity
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Depends on contract. If it's a private house rented, a certain level of basics is kinda expected. They dont really expect to come down to grease a door.
Case in point, my next door neighbor died while we were away and his house has been rented out by his daughter since then. First tenant drove her batty with calls every 2-3 weeks to come over and fix stuff like oiling hinges etc. When the contract rolled up, she offered to let them extend it but only after calculating her time and money and adding it to the rental price. They declined to pay an extra 250$ a month so had to move out. Like me, she didnt have a problem paying for materials, but didnt expect to have to come over for a 5 min job like a squeaky hinge.
I had to laugh at the list of stuff she was doing there. Ended up being 8 hours or so a month when you added in her travel time (she lives 2 hours each way away) but her contract was rather loose ended on 'repairs' as well as 'appliances'. (Next one, she used my agent for the contract and got a dream tenant who's still there).
Enjoy with me the few I remember: Dog dug a hole in the back yard and she had to come down and fill it back in, various doors squeeked in winter so she had to oil them, rope on swingset broke so she had to tie a new one on, weed wacker line broke several times and she had to come down and re-string it, toilet clogged and she had to come over with a plunger (did not need a plummer, just a plunger), sink got slow draining due to grease and she had to come over with a bottle of liquid plummer (normal clog due to them pouring grease down it and never flushing with hot water), and my all time favorite: the lawnmower stopped working and when she checked it, it was just out of gas!
LOL! But the Brenda we are helping here, obviously isnt that sort and her head seems on straight. Just asking normal questions on 'how to'.
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Wrong. General maintenance is the tennants responsibility. Paragraph 20 in the contract i use:
20. Maintenance and Repair. Lessee will, at his sole expense, keep and maintain the leased premises and appurtenances in good and sanitary condition and repair during the term of this lease and any renewal thereof. In particular, Lessee shall keep the fixtures in the house or on or about the leased premises in good order and repair; keep the furnace clean; keep the electric bills in order; keep the walks free from dirt and debris; and, at his sole expense, shall make all required repairs to the plumbing, range, heating, apparatus, and electric and gas fixtures whenever damage thereto shall have resulted from Lessee's misuse, waste, or neglect or that of his employee, family, agent, or visitor. Major maintenance and repair of the leased premises, not due to Lessee's misuse, waste, or neglect or that of his employee, family, agent, or visitor, shall be the responsibility of Lessor or his assigns. Lessee agrees that no signs shall be placed or painting done on or about the leased premises by Lessee or at his direction without the prior written consent of Lessor.
steve
honestly its really the landlords responsiblity
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The auto parts store near me sells lithium grease in a spray can. I bet that would work nicely.
--
Christopher A. Young
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on 12/8/2008 6:44 AM Bonnie Jean said the following:

Just put some Vaseline in the track and bearings of the rollers.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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